36 Songs, 2 Hours 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where’d You Learn to Kiss That Way? is a 36-song compilation assembling three years (1988—1991) of prolific output from The Field Mice’s recordings on Sarah Records. Somewhat similar to The Vaselines, the Surrey, England, band has been revered as a twee-pop pioneer by everyone from Beachwood Sparks to Belle & Sebastian. After hearing Bobby Wratten’s lovelorn voice in the shimmering guitar-pop gem “If You Need Someone” from the band’s 1990 EP The Autumn Store Part 1, it’s easy to compare his gentle timbre to that of Belle & Sebastian's Stuart Murdoch. The opening “Five Moments” from 1991’s Five Moments is awash in synthesizers and the gossamer voice of Annemari Davies, who joined the band in 1990. (The collection is sequenced non-chronologically.) The Field Mice’s second single, "Sensitive," proved to be the band’s breakthrough. With its lo-fi, Johnny Marr–inspired guitar jangle prone to distorted outbreaks and Wratten’s boyish singing balancing overhead, “Sensitive” is near-perfect indie-pop. “Let’s Kiss and Make Up” is another standout; St. Etienne covered it in 1991.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where’d You Learn to Kiss That Way? is a 36-song compilation assembling three years (1988—1991) of prolific output from The Field Mice’s recordings on Sarah Records. Somewhat similar to The Vaselines, the Surrey, England, band has been revered as a twee-pop pioneer by everyone from Beachwood Sparks to Belle & Sebastian. After hearing Bobby Wratten’s lovelorn voice in the shimmering guitar-pop gem “If You Need Someone” from the band’s 1990 EP The Autumn Store Part 1, it’s easy to compare his gentle timbre to that of Belle & Sebastian's Stuart Murdoch. The opening “Five Moments” from 1991’s Five Moments is awash in synthesizers and the gossamer voice of Annemari Davies, who joined the band in 1990. (The collection is sequenced non-chronologically.) The Field Mice’s second single, "Sensitive," proved to be the band’s breakthrough. With its lo-fi, Johnny Marr–inspired guitar jangle prone to distorted outbreaks and Wratten’s boyish singing balancing overhead, “Sensitive” is near-perfect indie-pop. “Let’s Kiss and Make Up” is another standout; St. Etienne covered it in 1991.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

ajn4664 ,

Best band ever....he's kidding right???

Not to say this is a bad collection...because its certainly deserving of praise, but to put this band in the same context as the Beatles isn't really fair. I've loved this band since I discovered them in the last year, but I wouldn't put them up there with the all time greats. It's an enjoyable collection of songs but don't expect everyone you to love them like the Beatles. If you enjoy laid back pop music (ie Belle and Sebastian) then you'll love the Field Mice, but if not you'll be disapointed.

bb1038 ,

The best band in the world....

Yes, the Field Mice were better than the Beatles (at least for me....). This is a collection of songs that no record collection should be without. Robert Wratten has an exquisite gift for lyrics and imagery--with The Field Mice and in his later work with TBS. These are songs you can almost taste and feel......

nicecut45 ,

Very good collection

Before Itunes this album was insanely difficult to obtain let alone any of their regular albums. With that said, this band is among the best ignored bands from the early 90's as they were swept aside by blur, Oasis, and the Stone Roses to name a few. This collection is well worth the listen if you enjoy the early Manchester music scene.

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