12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Emily Alone is the kind of album that you take out for special, specific occasions: a long drive, a walk alone, a passing hour at home when you want to separate yourself from routine and get a slightly closer look at the simple marvel of being. If that sounds a little precious, well, that’s because it is. But under Emily Sprague’s childlike delivery and delicate lattices of acoustic guitar is a quiet strength that comes from real introspection—not always a comfortable journey.

“These are the days like the deepest caves you would never dare to descend into,” she sings on “Time Is a Dark Feeling.” And later, on “Shadow Bloom”: “Do you really want to know the thing/You spend your life trying to find?” These are challenges, tough questions, thoughts that rustle the mind. Still, no matter how deep Sprague wades into the wilderness of the self, she always comes back to simple scenes of everyday life: the breaking of a wave, ivy growing outside her window. Spare, beautiful, but quietly intense, Emily Alone maps the silence inside.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Emily Alone is the kind of album that you take out for special, specific occasions: a long drive, a walk alone, a passing hour at home when you want to separate yourself from routine and get a slightly closer look at the simple marvel of being. If that sounds a little precious, well, that’s because it is. But under Emily Sprague’s childlike delivery and delicate lattices of acoustic guitar is a quiet strength that comes from real introspection—not always a comfortable journey.

“These are the days like the deepest caves you would never dare to descend into,” she sings on “Time Is a Dark Feeling.” And later, on “Shadow Bloom”: “Do you really want to know the thing/You spend your life trying to find?” These are challenges, tough questions, thoughts that rustle the mind. Still, no matter how deep Sprague wades into the wilderness of the self, she always comes back to simple scenes of everyday life: the breaking of a wave, ivy growing outside her window. Spare, beautiful, but quietly intense, Emily Alone maps the silence inside.

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