15 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Living Colour's second studio album—like its predecessor, Vivid—nails down ambitious hard rock bordering on heavy metal and funk. Yet here the versatile group deepened their range considerably from the basic blueprint of the debut. Guest appearances from Queen Latifah, Don Byron, Doug E. Fresh, early supporter Mick Jagger, Little Richard, and Maceo Parker help keep the energy moving. The songs include Bad Brains–styled thrash on the title track, tough rockers (“Type,” Will Calhoun’s “Pride,” “Information Overload," and “New Jack Theme”), eclectic funk-punk (“Elvis Is Dead”), and psychedelic funk (Corey Glover’s “Under Cover of Darkness”). Guitar virtuoso Vernon Reid wrote much of the material, but he leaves plenty of room for the other members to lock in place and dominate. The album finishes with several contemplative songs—“Solace of You,” “This Is the Life”—that show the band's often-overlooked heart. (This was also Living Colour's final full-length studio album to feature bassist Muzz Skillings; he amicably parted ways after the Biscuits EP).

EDITORS’ NOTES

Living Colour's second studio album—like its predecessor, Vivid—nails down ambitious hard rock bordering on heavy metal and funk. Yet here the versatile group deepened their range considerably from the basic blueprint of the debut. Guest appearances from Queen Latifah, Don Byron, Doug E. Fresh, early supporter Mick Jagger, Little Richard, and Maceo Parker help keep the energy moving. The songs include Bad Brains–styled thrash on the title track, tough rockers (“Type,” Will Calhoun’s “Pride,” “Information Overload," and “New Jack Theme”), eclectic funk-punk (“Elvis Is Dead”), and psychedelic funk (Corey Glover’s “Under Cover of Darkness”). Guitar virtuoso Vernon Reid wrote much of the material, but he leaves plenty of room for the other members to lock in place and dominate. The album finishes with several contemplative songs—“Solace of You,” “This Is the Life”—that show the band's often-overlooked heart. (This was also Living Colour's final full-length studio album to feature bassist Muzz Skillings; he amicably parted ways after the Biscuits EP).

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
55 Ratings

55 Ratings

grawhide ,

Greatest Album of the 90's?

Underrated and oddly ignored, Time's Up is by far the best album Living Colour ever produced and may be the best album of the nineties. They way they blend hard rock, jazz, funk and even a little hip-hop takes you to places you didn't think were possible, creating it's own musical genre. Listen to the short musical interlude, Ology, and I defy you to tell me you've ever heard something so strange, beautiful and ultimately transcendant in your life. I've been listening to this disc since I was 15 years old, and now, at 33, still admire it's bravery and ingenuity. Do yourself a favor and buy this amazing album.

Little Miss Peepers ,

Greatness... pure, unbridled greatness.

What else can be said? Profound lyrics that would make Plato give pause to ponder and debate, combined with the finest guitar, bass, and drum playing in the history of the human race makes for an album that is a must have. Like their debut album "Vivid," this is one of the top ten greatest albums in rock history. No lover of music is living a complete life without owning this album.

Ken Scar ,

Solace of You should have been a #1 mega-hit

Somebody in Living Colour's camp screwed up when that song wasn't released as a single. It should have been a HUGE HIT. It remains one of my all-time favorite songs of the last 20 years. The reggae beat, the world-music vibe, the delicious acoustic licks, the poignant lyrics - it's everything a song should be.

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