12 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s an adage that a good song works even when it’s stripped to its essentials. You know a piece is solid when it comes across with just a voice and a guitar. The 12 tracks on Luciana Souza’s Duos III stand up nicely to that test. Then again, the three masterful guitarists who appear on the album—Toninho Horta, Romero Lubambo, and Marco Pereira—provide accompaniment that brings to mind one-man orchestras. (Lubambo and Pereira previously played on 2002’s Brazilian Duos and 2005’s Duos II.) Souza’s husband, Larry Klein, who's well-known for his collaborations with female artists, produced this fine set. “Tim Tim por Tim Tim,” from the pen of Haroldo Barbosa and Geraldo Jacques, flies by in a minute and a half as Souza and Horta joyfully render it with a sharp sense of musical detail. Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “Chora Coracao,” with Pereira on guitar, comes across like a low-key aria. “Eu Vim da Bahia,” by Gilberto Gil, retains the songwriter’s touch in a jazzy version that displays Pereira’s virtuosity. Lubambo is wonderful on Jobim’s “Dindi,” and Souza’s delicate handling of the melody may bring a tear to your eye.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s an adage that a good song works even when it’s stripped to its essentials. You know a piece is solid when it comes across with just a voice and a guitar. The 12 tracks on Luciana Souza’s Duos III stand up nicely to that test. Then again, the three masterful guitarists who appear on the album—Toninho Horta, Romero Lubambo, and Marco Pereira—provide accompaniment that brings to mind one-man orchestras. (Lubambo and Pereira previously played on 2002’s Brazilian Duos and 2005’s Duos II.) Souza’s husband, Larry Klein, who's well-known for his collaborations with female artists, produced this fine set. “Tim Tim por Tim Tim,” from the pen of Haroldo Barbosa and Geraldo Jacques, flies by in a minute and a half as Souza and Horta joyfully render it with a sharp sense of musical detail. Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “Chora Coracao,” with Pereira on guitar, comes across like a low-key aria. “Eu Vim da Bahia,” by Gilberto Gil, retains the songwriter’s touch in a jazzy version that displays Pereira’s virtuosity. Lubambo is wonderful on Jobim’s “Dindi,” and Souza’s delicate handling of the melody may bring a tear to your eye.

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