23 Songs, 1 Hour 11 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over six decades, Dolly Parton has written songs that honestly and gracefully embody the struggles of being a woman. For Netflix’s new film Dumplin’, she continues that work, partnering with producer Linda Perry to craft six original songs from the perspective of an upstart small-town girl looking to shake up the beauty pageant scene and challenge pernicious stereotypes. Parton gets raw about those very expectations on the soft country song “Who,” and turns wistful about measuring up to impossible standards on the strings-laden “Girl in the Movies.” She also reworked several of her classics, tapping Miranda Lambert to update one of her first country singles, “Dumb Blonde,” as well as Sia (“Here I Am”), Elle King (“Holdin’ on to You”), Macy Gray and Dorothy (“Two Doors Down”), and more. The cherry on top is an orchestral version of “Jolene,” which reveals her plea in a new light: Parton’s voice practically breaks as she begs the titular character, hitting a new emotional gravitas 45 years after the song was first released.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over six decades, Dolly Parton has written songs that honestly and gracefully embody the struggles of being a woman. For Netflix’s new film Dumplin’, she continues that work, partnering with producer Linda Perry to craft six original songs from the perspective of an upstart small-town girl looking to shake up the beauty pageant scene and challenge pernicious stereotypes. Parton gets raw about those very expectations on the soft country song “Who,” and turns wistful about measuring up to impossible standards on the strings-laden “Girl in the Movies.” She also reworked several of her classics, tapping Miranda Lambert to update one of her first country singles, “Dumb Blonde,” as well as Sia (“Here I Am”), Elle King (“Holdin’ on to You”), Macy Gray and Dorothy (“Two Doors Down”), and more. The cherry on top is an orchestral version of “Jolene,” which reveals her plea in a new light: Parton’s voice practically breaks as she begs the titular character, hitting a new emotional gravitas 45 years after the song was first released.

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