14 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though primitive instrumental remixes had been appearing on the flipsides of Jamaican 45s since at least 1967, the production style known as dub didn’t come into full flower until the early ‘70s, when the very first full-length dub albums started to appear in small numbers from producers like Lee Perry, Herman “Chin” Loy, and King Tubby. Tubby’s early productions, drenched in echo and thunderous bass, did much to help define the characteristic sound of this new music. His LP Dub from the Roots, which appeared on the Total Sounds label in 1974, stands with equally canonical releases—like Lee Perry’s Blackboard Jungle Dub and Keith Hudson’s Pick a Dub—as a startlingly innovative example of this radically experimental new production style. This set features Tubby tackling 14 unimpeachable rhythms from producer Bunny Lee and his house band The Aggrovators. Using delay, reverb, and a grab bag of disorienting studio effects, Tubby imbues these sturdy reggae instrumentals with a sense of otherworldly grandeur that was wholly unique at the time of its release—and should prove equally astounding to contemporary listeners.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though primitive instrumental remixes had been appearing on the flipsides of Jamaican 45s since at least 1967, the production style known as dub didn’t come into full flower until the early ‘70s, when the very first full-length dub albums started to appear in small numbers from producers like Lee Perry, Herman “Chin” Loy, and King Tubby. Tubby’s early productions, drenched in echo and thunderous bass, did much to help define the characteristic sound of this new music. His LP Dub from the Roots, which appeared on the Total Sounds label in 1974, stands with equally canonical releases—like Lee Perry’s Blackboard Jungle Dub and Keith Hudson’s Pick a Dub—as a startlingly innovative example of this radically experimental new production style. This set features Tubby tackling 14 unimpeachable rhythms from producer Bunny Lee and his house band The Aggrovators. Using delay, reverb, and a grab bag of disorienting studio effects, Tubby imbues these sturdy reggae instrumentals with a sense of otherworldly grandeur that was wholly unique at the time of its release—and should prove equally astounding to contemporary listeners.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

BRANDre85 ,

great album

I know I'm super late to King Tubby, but if you like good music it's for you. Been listening to a lot of 60s and 70s reggae and ska, this dub album in particular is amazing. I'd say a big plus too is the songs don't drag on, enough to really get into you and then leave you wanting more. If you like this I'd also recommend Desmond Dekkar and the Aces, the Ethiopians, and the Maytals first album, but if you are here you might already know those names. All great music that everyone should be familiar with.

More By King Tubby

You May Also Like