14 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over the decades following Tim Buckley’s death in 1975, his music has continued to be reissued, covered and re-explored with live and studio tapes which further our understanding of this constantly evolving musician. The March and June 1968 tapes were first issued in a limited edition, mail-order/Internet only collection. They feature superior or as-good takes of “Song to the Siren,” “Sing a Song for You,” “Happy Time” and “Buzzin’ Fly” as well as songs like “Ashbury Park” and “Danang” that evolved into “Love from Room 109 at the Islander (On Pacific Coast Highway)” on one of Buckley’s masterworks, Happy/Sad. The second half of the collection comes from February 1973 when Buckley was a very changed man and determined to break through to the mainstream listening public with conventional songs that still featured his brilliance as the title track and “Falling Timber” (outtakes from Sefronia) indicate. It’s all further proof that everything Buckley recorded, even his often questioned later work, is worthwhile and still criminally overlooked.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over the decades following Tim Buckley’s death in 1975, his music has continued to be reissued, covered and re-explored with live and studio tapes which further our understanding of this constantly evolving musician. The March and June 1968 tapes were first issued in a limited edition, mail-order/Internet only collection. They feature superior or as-good takes of “Song to the Siren,” “Sing a Song for You,” “Happy Time” and “Buzzin’ Fly” as well as songs like “Ashbury Park” and “Danang” that evolved into “Love from Room 109 at the Islander (On Pacific Coast Highway)” on one of Buckley’s masterworks, Happy/Sad. The second half of the collection comes from February 1973 when Buckley was a very changed man and determined to break through to the mainstream listening public with conventional songs that still featured his brilliance as the title track and “Falling Timber” (outtakes from Sefronia) indicate. It’s all further proof that everything Buckley recorded, even his often questioned later work, is worthwhile and still criminally overlooked.

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