20 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The dance anthems “Wah Watusi” and “Crossfire!” capture the Orlons at their 1962-63 best: fitting their tough, three-gals-and-a-guy vocals over peppy pop-R&B grooves. “South Street,” “Don’t Hang Up,” and “Knock! Knock! (Who’s There?)” exhibit a tinge of novelty (thanks to Steve Caldwell’s sub-bass vocal accents) but rock nonetheless. The adaptation of Slim Gaillard’s deliberately goofy 1945 classic “Cement Mixer” is light-hearted fun, but a demo of the doo-wop ballad “Mr. Twenty One” – just voices and piano – is near sublime. Later tracks “Don’t You Want My Lovin’” (1965), an early Gamble & Huff production, and “Spinning Top” (1966) are grittier faux-Motown creations.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The dance anthems “Wah Watusi” and “Crossfire!” capture the Orlons at their 1962-63 best: fitting their tough, three-gals-and-a-guy vocals over peppy pop-R&B grooves. “South Street,” “Don’t Hang Up,” and “Knock! Knock! (Who’s There?)” exhibit a tinge of novelty (thanks to Steve Caldwell’s sub-bass vocal accents) but rock nonetheless. The adaptation of Slim Gaillard’s deliberately goofy 1945 classic “Cement Mixer” is light-hearted fun, but a demo of the doo-wop ballad “Mr. Twenty One” – just voices and piano – is near sublime. Later tracks “Don’t You Want My Lovin’” (1965), an early Gamble & Huff production, and “Spinning Top” (1966) are grittier faux-Motown creations.

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