15 Songs, 1 Hour 9 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This English chanteuse takes her time and immerses herself in placid, soothing soundscapes that compliment her smooth, pretty voice to the point where you might miss the emotional insecurities that run just beneath the surface. On just her third solo album since her 1999 debut, Dido continues her streak of attractive adult-contemporary pop. “Don’t Believe In Love” and “Never Want to Say It’s Love” use Jon Brion’s creamy keyboards and steadying production hand to hide the tough questions facing lovers at any point of introspection. Brian Eno adds his extra flourishes to “Grafton Street,” a six-minute ethereal moan through flute-inspired fields of remorse. Mick Fleetwood, Citizen Cope and Questlove from the Roots make cameo appearances that strengthen the tunes in subtle ways. But it’s still Dido’s show. It’s her melancholy that shadows the sweet melodies of “It Comes and It Goes” and “Northern Skies” and paces the slow mourn of the piano ballad “Look No Further.”  “Us 2 Little Gods” adds an extra skip-step for balance, while “Let’s Do the Things We Normally Do” pushes through with a nightclub ambience, but it’s only a diversion from the ominous clouds that circle her existence.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This English chanteuse takes her time and immerses herself in placid, soothing soundscapes that compliment her smooth, pretty voice to the point where you might miss the emotional insecurities that run just beneath the surface. On just her third solo album since her 1999 debut, Dido continues her streak of attractive adult-contemporary pop. “Don’t Believe In Love” and “Never Want to Say It’s Love” use Jon Brion’s creamy keyboards and steadying production hand to hide the tough questions facing lovers at any point of introspection. Brian Eno adds his extra flourishes to “Grafton Street,” a six-minute ethereal moan through flute-inspired fields of remorse. Mick Fleetwood, Citizen Cope and Questlove from the Roots make cameo appearances that strengthen the tunes in subtle ways. But it’s still Dido’s show. It’s her melancholy that shadows the sweet melodies of “It Comes and It Goes” and “Northern Skies” and paces the slow mourn of the piano ballad “Look No Further.”  “Us 2 Little Gods” adds an extra skip-step for balance, while “Let’s Do the Things We Normally Do” pushes through with a nightclub ambience, but it’s only a diversion from the ominous clouds that circle her existence.

TITLE TIME
15

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
222 Ratings

222 Ratings

dollphyn ,

Takes time to appreciate

I was a little disappointed when I first listened to this album. It seemed boring, too mellow, without any personality. But I've given it a week, and I find myself singing it to myself all the time, and automatically playing it on my itunes at work. The songs are all very pretty and musical, and Dido's voice is beautiful as always.

I feel like she didn't make this album with the intention for it to be played on the radio all the time, she just made music she enjoyed making. I think she just wanted us to have something sweet to listen to at home snuggled up under a blanket. For me, this album lacks big changes in volume and rhythm, which create the swells of emotion that are present in the first two albums. Maybe it's too subtle, and I am too impatient to enjoy it as much as her earlier albums.

All in all, still a great album! Just a little dfferent.

jmdebany ,

Beautifully Written

I've read many posts that fault Safe Trip Home for its somber mood, which I don't think should be held against it. Though it lacks in bombast and catchy dance beats--most people seem to only be attracted to those things--it comes across as honest and heartfelt and doesn't put on a false smile to please the crowd. There is more depth to her lyric writing on Safe Trip Home than in her last two records, which, although good, (I feel) were more straight forward.

There is a real melancholy in her voice and the songs, not the typical kind that is fabricated to appeal to teenagers. Safe Trip Home proves that Dido has far more substance than many people will give her credit for.

Swansteel ,

I LOVE this album!

This album is amazing. I downloaded it at midnight and listened to it for the next three hours! I just kept listening to songs over and over and still wanted to hear them again. The songs feel very low-key at first, but with repeated listenings, the music grows and takes root in your brain. Dido's voice is beautiful and the music is rich, full of swelling string arrangements and unusual instrumentation. I simply LOVE this album!

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