17 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kash Doll’s 2017 breakout hit “For Everybody” was a PSA of sorts. The Detroit MC implored her sisters not to sweat any one man’s fidelity because they are literally “for everybody.” Her debut album, Stacked, is informative in a similar way in that the young star leans on her life experience—which includes a brief career as an exotic dancer—to empower fans and keep them focused on the primary tenets of nouveau queendom: stunting hard and never apologizing for it.

In the event that a listener were to be distracted by Kash Doll’s appearance (“stacked" is, among other meanings, slang for the build of a voluptuous woman), she drags wandering eyes upward with album opener “KD Diary,” a cascading and emotional retelling of her origin story in the image of Meek Mill’s “Dreams and Nightmares” and Tee Grizzley’s “First Day Out.” The MC’s rapping across songs like “Mobb’n,” “Paid Bitches,” and the particularly sentimental “100 of Us” sets her a chasm apart from the legions of modern-day pinup girls attempting to parlay a social media following into a music career. There is likewise something to be said of the particularly inspired verse she got from Lil Wayne for “Kitten.”

What Kash Doll aims to embody on Stacked is a young boss having her way. Across the project, the MC’s lifestyle is pronounced and easy to admire: “I hate coupons, I hate futons/Them n*ggas with that little bread, I hate croutons!” she snarls on “Cheap S**t.” “Can’t f**k an NBA n*gga if he ain’t starting,” she notes on “Doin Too Much.” But there are also moments of vulnerability. On “Feel Something,” she admits that even as a woman with the world at her feet, there are limitations to her lifestyle: “All these diamonds ain’t gon’ keep me warm at night.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kash Doll’s 2017 breakout hit “For Everybody” was a PSA of sorts. The Detroit MC implored her sisters not to sweat any one man’s fidelity because they are literally “for everybody.” Her debut album, Stacked, is informative in a similar way in that the young star leans on her life experience—which includes a brief career as an exotic dancer—to empower fans and keep them focused on the primary tenets of nouveau queendom: stunting hard and never apologizing for it.

In the event that a listener were to be distracted by Kash Doll’s appearance (“stacked" is, among other meanings, slang for the build of a voluptuous woman), she drags wandering eyes upward with album opener “KD Diary,” a cascading and emotional retelling of her origin story in the image of Meek Mill’s “Dreams and Nightmares” and Tee Grizzley’s “First Day Out.” The MC’s rapping across songs like “Mobb’n,” “Paid Bitches,” and the particularly sentimental “100 of Us” sets her a chasm apart from the legions of modern-day pinup girls attempting to parlay a social media following into a music career. There is likewise something to be said of the particularly inspired verse she got from Lil Wayne for “Kitten.”

What Kash Doll aims to embody on Stacked is a young boss having her way. Across the project, the MC’s lifestyle is pronounced and easy to admire: “I hate coupons, I hate futons/Them n*ggas with that little bread, I hate croutons!” she snarls on “Cheap S**t.” “Can’t f**k an NBA n*gga if he ain’t starting,” she notes on “Doin Too Much.” But there are also moments of vulnerability. On “Feel Something,” she admits that even as a woman with the world at her feet, there are limitations to her lifestyle: “All these diamonds ain’t gon’ keep me warm at night.”

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