16 Songs, 1 Hour 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“You are all about to witness some organic Hip-Hop-Jazz! One-hundred percent groove!”, exhorts The Roots’ mouthpiece Black Thought at the outset of 1994’s Do You Want More. What follows is a remarkable demonstration of instrumental and lyrical virtuosity that finds Black Thought and drummer and arranger ?uestlove leading The Roots through a series of loose, abstracted instrumental grooves and Old School inflected rhymes. They chart a bold course through the history of African American music, embracing the jazzy meanderings of Horace Silver, the tight grooves of the JB’s, the enlightening lyrics of KRS-One, and countless points in between. This music is, at its root, classic Hip-Hop with it’s feet firmly planted in the progressive aesthetic of contemporaries like Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, and a host of other boundary pushing rap outfits of the early nineties. The Roots’ subsequent triumphs, such as 1999’s sublime Things Fall Apart, have overshadowed the significant accomplishments of Do You Want More an album that deserves to be considered a Hip-Hop classic.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“You are all about to witness some organic Hip-Hop-Jazz! One-hundred percent groove!”, exhorts The Roots’ mouthpiece Black Thought at the outset of 1994’s Do You Want More. What follows is a remarkable demonstration of instrumental and lyrical virtuosity that finds Black Thought and drummer and arranger ?uestlove leading The Roots through a series of loose, abstracted instrumental grooves and Old School inflected rhymes. They chart a bold course through the history of African American music, embracing the jazzy meanderings of Horace Silver, the tight grooves of the JB’s, the enlightening lyrics of KRS-One, and countless points in between. This music is, at its root, classic Hip-Hop with it’s feet firmly planted in the progressive aesthetic of contemporaries like Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, and a host of other boundary pushing rap outfits of the early nineties. The Roots’ subsequent triumphs, such as 1999’s sublime Things Fall Apart, have overshadowed the significant accomplishments of Do You Want More an album that deserves to be considered a Hip-Hop classic.

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