12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Once upon a time, actor Jason Schwartzman was Phantom Planet’s drummer. Also, once upon a time, Phantom Planet dabbled in various shades of sunny pop rock, edgy garage revival rock, and plain old ‘mersh rock with a slight alt-leaning... but, always, the band had a flair for the ballad, for songs the girls love, and even songs that find their way onto TV shows like “The O.C.” On Raise the Dead, the band’s fourth studio album, the L.A. rockers have found their sound, and it was right there all the time, right under their shag-cut bangs. Choppy, angled rhythms and textured, evocative vocals meet up with pop hooks and rock arrangements both contemporary and vintage; storytelling is flavored with a healthy balance of yearning and caustic worldliness; and an exuberant, almost manic energy manages to flow and breathe at the appropriate moments. The joyful, retro feel of “Leave Yourself for Somebody Else,” the staccato vocals and springy vigor of “Dropped,” and the bah-bah-bah chorus of the re-worked “Do the Panic” should please fans no end, but the real stars — the Byrne-ish “Raise the Dead,” the staggering force of “Geronimo,” and the Brit-inflected “Ship Lost at Sea” — should make non-fans sit up and take notice as well.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Once upon a time, actor Jason Schwartzman was Phantom Planet’s drummer. Also, once upon a time, Phantom Planet dabbled in various shades of sunny pop rock, edgy garage revival rock, and plain old ‘mersh rock with a slight alt-leaning... but, always, the band had a flair for the ballad, for songs the girls love, and even songs that find their way onto TV shows like “The O.C.” On Raise the Dead, the band’s fourth studio album, the L.A. rockers have found their sound, and it was right there all the time, right under their shag-cut bangs. Choppy, angled rhythms and textured, evocative vocals meet up with pop hooks and rock arrangements both contemporary and vintage; storytelling is flavored with a healthy balance of yearning and caustic worldliness; and an exuberant, almost manic energy manages to flow and breathe at the appropriate moments. The joyful, retro feel of “Leave Yourself for Somebody Else,” the staccato vocals and springy vigor of “Dropped,” and the bah-bah-bah chorus of the re-worked “Do the Panic” should please fans no end, but the real stars — the Byrne-ish “Raise the Dead,” the staggering force of “Geronimo,” and the Brit-inflected “Ship Lost at Sea” — should make non-fans sit up and take notice as well.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

TTYG FUCT IOH FAD ,

Honda Civic

I had NEVER heard of these guys until the honda civic tour in april, and i freakin loved em! Right when i got home the first thing I did, was check out these guys. I love how simple they sound and alex's voice really makes the music sound mysterious. My favorites would have to be either Do the Panic or Dropped.

Booji619 ,

I Can Dig It, Just Wish It Was Harder and Louder!

All and all, I can dig it. After waiting 4 years since the self titled Phantom Planet, I was hoping that this album would have a be a bit more fire behind. Progression is great and so is musical headway. I was just hoping for more of a harder sound like Jabberjaw or Making A Killing. Even the slower songs on the self-titled album like "Your Not Welcomed Here" and "By The Bed" tore through my speakers with a loud reverb fire. But I digress.

This new album is really good. "Leader" "Do The Panic" and "Too Much Too Often" are great. Phantom Planet put on a great show in San Diego on April 12th. I would recommend this album to everyone.

Good Show Boys!

rachelsaur! ,

Honda Civic Tour

I saw these guys yesterday fro the first time ever on the Honda Civic Tour w/ Panic At The Disco and they were amazing. This is a great album, especially, do the panic

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