11 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Why it took so long for a lowdown, dirty garage rock band to name an album Disgraceland is a mystery. But the point is that The Orwells have finally done it, and it's a very deserving album indeed. The Chicago band were barely out of high school when they made some impressive noise with their 2012 debut, Remember When, and won David Letterman’s heart with an amusing appearance on his show in early 2013. Disgraceland is exactly what it should be: squalling guitars, crusty distortion, cranium-shattering tom assaults, and efficient melodies that are almost embarrassingly tasty and memorable. Mario Cuomo—whether singing of vomit-choking, motorcycle-crashing, or front-seat automobile-trysting—has an uncanny way of delivering a hooky turn of phrase with a voice hewn out of damp wood soaked in day-old beer. There’s really not a bad track here, but the grinding yowl of “The Righteous One” and the unhinged, relentless pummel of “Who Needs You” could bring Joey Ramone back. Not old enough to drink in most states, The Orwells could show many a grizzled rock band a thing or two.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

Why it took so long for a lowdown, dirty garage rock band to name an album Disgraceland is a mystery. But the point is that The Orwells have finally done it, and it's a very deserving album indeed. The Chicago band were barely out of high school when they made some impressive noise with their 2012 debut, Remember When, and won David Letterman’s heart with an amusing appearance on his show in early 2013. Disgraceland is exactly what it should be: squalling guitars, crusty distortion, cranium-shattering tom assaults, and efficient melodies that are almost embarrassingly tasty and memorable. Mario Cuomo—whether singing of vomit-choking, motorcycle-crashing, or front-seat automobile-trysting—has an uncanny way of delivering a hooky turn of phrase with a voice hewn out of damp wood soaked in day-old beer. There’s really not a bad track here, but the grinding yowl of “The Righteous One” and the unhinged, relentless pummel of “Who Needs You” could bring Joey Ramone back. Not old enough to drink in most states, The Orwells could show many a grizzled rock band a thing or two.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
184 Ratings

184 Ratings

Anya27 ,

I think I have a problem.

I saw these guys live and their singer was so ripped that I couldn't pay attention to much else, but they still just sounded good! I came home, sent them an angry message, and promptly started listening to their music on repeat play. They're like every guy I ever dated in college: should I invite them in for drinks or punch them in the face? But they don't sound like anyone else and their stuff is dirty and young, selfish and kind of great. I can tell they're playing for people younger and cooler than I am, but I'll be the one jamming them in my crossover with the windows down at the stoplight and you can judge me however you want.

DoeYogi ,

Rebirth of Exciting Music

People need to take this as an example and start making raw music like this again. The music nowadays seem dull and repetetive!

FredBanger ,

Rad.

The album from the suburbs that sounds better than the albums from the city.

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