9 Songs, 1 Hour 10 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is one of 2018’s most exciting piano concerto recordings. It combines an outstanding, electrifying pianist with an imaginative, commanding conductor, plus one of America’s greatest orchestras. Presented through the prism of Rachmaninov’s travels—fleeing Russia, journeying around the world as a performer, settling in the United States—this recording of the Second and Fourth Concertos is magnificent. The Second is noble, romantic, and wonderfully rich, while the more complex Fourth is superbly realized. Between them comes Bach envisioned by Rachmaninov and played by Trifonov with delicacy and delicious insouciance.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is one of 2018’s most exciting piano concerto recordings. It combines an outstanding, electrifying pianist with an imaginative, commanding conductor, plus one of America’s greatest orchestras. Presented through the prism of Rachmaninov’s travels—fleeing Russia, journeying around the world as a performer, settling in the United States—this recording of the Second and Fourth Concertos is magnificent. The Second is noble, romantic, and wonderfully rich, while the more complex Fourth is superbly realized. Between them comes Bach envisioned by Rachmaninov and played by Trifonov with delicacy and delicious insouciance.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

alexkhan2000 ,

A Great "Modern" Rachmaninov

There are many great Rachmaninov recordings out there by many great pianists. There are my old favorites by the likes of Sviatoslav Richter and Jorge Bolet and the more recent by Evgeny Kissin and Kristian Zimerman. From the young upstarts, I've got Yuja Wang's version and then this by Daniil Trifonov. They are all great and it's always fascinating to hear these different versions performed by different pianists, conductors and orchestras. They all have their different "flavors" with their unique interpretations, feel and sound.

I'm not going to say one specific version by one specific pianist is better than another. One can't go wrong when choosing only one from any of the aforementioned pianists. Fortunately, some of us can choose more. I love to listen to all the different greats from different eras. From the old noisy mono recordings from the 20th century titans like Horowitz, Rubinstein, Arrau, Richter, Serkin, and Gilels to living legends like Argerich, Barenboim, Kissin, Perahia and Brendel and to the more "modern" pianists like Vikingur Olafsson, Jan Lisiecki, and Leif Ove Andsnes, I love them all. I wish I had more time to enjoy even more. All this being said, for whatever reason, it seems I end up listening to Trifonov more than anyone else these days.

Trifonov, to my ears, seems to have this perfect fusion or integration of breathtakingly effortless technique, feel, touch, tone and depth that is unique and wholly his own. He can be dazzling a la Horowitz, Kissin or Argerich, passionate like a Rubinstein, sonorous and introspective like an Arrau and delicate like a Cortot. But, at the same time, he is much more than just a jack-of-all-trades virtuoso. That would not be giving him enough credit. He fuses all these elements into a cohesive style and sound of his own. This is what I find so exciting about him.

Having listened to his entire catalogue from his debut to this latest recording, I can definitely hear him continuously improving and maturing as an artist, not just as a pianist. His tone is richer and deeper while maintaining the same clarity and flowing articulation that his playing is known for. I understand that Trifonov isn't for everyone in the same way that Horowitz, Arrau, and Richter weren't in the 20th century and the way Kissin, Argerich, and Perahia aren't now. Music is a deeply subjective thing and there will always be millions of different opinions.

This is definitely one of the best Rachmaninov recordings I've had the pleasure of listening to. The overall sound and production are gorgeous. Trifonov's playing is brilliant as well as heartfelt. The Philadelphia Orchestra under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin is as lyrical as it is majestic. There is a distinctly Russian flavor to Rachmaninov's music that is epic in its sweeping scope and sentimental melodic flair as well as a certain type of power and grit one doesn't hear from German or French composers. All these characteristics are conveyed by Trifonov and the orchestra convincingly with passion as well as virtuosity.

I can hardly wait for what Trifonov will come up with next and it's exciting to think that he's only 28. One can only imagine where he'll be as an artist two decades from now or even further into the future as he continues to develop and mature. An artist of this caliber like this can define an entire century like Arrau, Horowitz, Richter, Rubinstein and Serkin did over the 20th century. It's way too early to say Trifonov can be ranked with such greats or with current giants like Argerich and Kissin. But that's what makes Trifonov so exciting. I feel like I can re-live in this era what piano fans were able to experience in the early-20th century when Horowitz burst onto the scene. The journey is only beginning, and I anxiously and joyously look forward to its continuation.

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