12 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After 25 years, Fishbone still had it. Fishbone Live (In Bordeaux) was released as a concert DVD in 5.1 Surround Sound, along with this audio-only companion disc. The horns on “Unyielding Condition” are thick and all-encompassing, and Norwood Fisher’s bass on “Bonin’ in the Boneyard” has a suitably subterranean rumble. Though the classic Fishbone lineup had long since fragmented, Fisher and singer Angelo Moore managed to keep the madcap momentum that drove the group’s early performances. At this point, “Party at Ground Zero” was more than 20 years old and had been performed hundreds of times, but the band still managed to turn the song into an eerie voodoo celebration. Everything about this concert is deep, chunky, and in-your-face. Moore sounds proud to serve as the group’s indefatigable ringmaster, with his elastic voice cutting through everything from the speedy cover of Sublime’s “Date Rape” to the thunderous and glutinous funk of “Everyday Sunshine.” By the time the band closes with a show-stopping version of “Freddie’s Dead,” listeners should agree that Fishbone has earned the right to Curtis Mayfield’s hallowed anthem.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After 25 years, Fishbone still had it. Fishbone Live (In Bordeaux) was released as a concert DVD in 5.1 Surround Sound, along with this audio-only companion disc. The horns on “Unyielding Condition” are thick and all-encompassing, and Norwood Fisher’s bass on “Bonin’ in the Boneyard” has a suitably subterranean rumble. Though the classic Fishbone lineup had long since fragmented, Fisher and singer Angelo Moore managed to keep the madcap momentum that drove the group’s early performances. At this point, “Party at Ground Zero” was more than 20 years old and had been performed hundreds of times, but the band still managed to turn the song into an eerie voodoo celebration. Everything about this concert is deep, chunky, and in-your-face. Moore sounds proud to serve as the group’s indefatigable ringmaster, with his elastic voice cutting through everything from the speedy cover of Sublime’s “Date Rape” to the thunderous and glutinous funk of “Everyday Sunshine.” By the time the band closes with a show-stopping version of “Freddie’s Dead,” listeners should agree that Fishbone has earned the right to Curtis Mayfield’s hallowed anthem.

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