10 Songs, 26 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hard-hitting Buffalo soul singer Darrel Banks had a hit right out of the gate with his first single: 1966’s “Open the Door to Your Heart” on the tiny Revilot label. The tune—a propulsive groover with a jumpy tempo, dynamite bass line, and incisive horn arrangement—raced to No. 2 on the R&B charts. Banks capitalized on this success with his next single, “Somebody Somewhere Needs You.” The buzz surrounding these two minor hits attracted the attention of ATCO Records, which released Banks’ debut LP, Darrell Banks Is Here!, in 1967. This album includes those successful early singles, as well as a brace of stellar tunes recorded after his signing. It’s all first-rate, equal parts deep soul tearjerkers and cracking dance tunes. Banks would release another album for Stax in 1969, but he never achieved anything like the success he deserved. Both of his LPs are essential listens for soul aficionados, and they're easily the equal of anything produced by contemporary gospel-influenced shouters like Wilson Pickett and Johnnie Taylor.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hard-hitting Buffalo soul singer Darrel Banks had a hit right out of the gate with his first single: 1966’s “Open the Door to Your Heart” on the tiny Revilot label. The tune—a propulsive groover with a jumpy tempo, dynamite bass line, and incisive horn arrangement—raced to No. 2 on the R&B charts. Banks capitalized on this success with his next single, “Somebody Somewhere Needs You.” The buzz surrounding these two minor hits attracted the attention of ATCO Records, which released Banks’ debut LP, Darrell Banks Is Here!, in 1967. This album includes those successful early singles, as well as a brace of stellar tunes recorded after his signing. It’s all first-rate, equal parts deep soul tearjerkers and cracking dance tunes. Banks would release another album for Stax in 1969, but he never achieved anything like the success he deserved. Both of his LPs are essential listens for soul aficionados, and they're easily the equal of anything produced by contemporary gospel-influenced shouters like Wilson Pickett and Johnnie Taylor.

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