Songs of Mass Destruction

Songs of Mass Destruction

“I’ve seen too much,” declares Annie Lennox on her fourth solo album, Songs of Mass Destruction (2007). Certainly, the ex-Eurythmics singer’s prodigious voice implies centuries of human experience. But for all her world-weariness, this pop grande dame seems desperate for renewal and liberation, both in personal and global terms: themes of struggle and heroism lend this album a somber yet stirring tone. As in the past, Lennox often projects an austere persona with “Through The Glass Darkly” and “Coloured Bedspread” as examples of her icier side. She can turn volcanic as well, smoldering soulfully on “Love Is Blind and erupting into thrilling vocal highs on “Big Sky.” Rather than striking the elusive poses of her earlier days, she makes songs like “Smithereens” and “Fingernail Moon” into revealing confessions, and striving for a sense of community, she includes just about every notable female singer you can think of on “Sing." On the whole, this album is utterly self-assured, thanks both to Lennox’s command of her art and Glen Ballard’s fine-tailored production. A long time in coming, Songs of Mass Destruction is a creation worthy of Lennox’s legendary status.

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