7 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Arthur Lee and his group of Los Angeles misfits dubbed Love transformed in front of everyone’s ears from an energetic punkish folk-rock group with their self-titled 1966 debut into an orchestrated psychedelic marvel with their third album, 1968’s Forever Changes. 1967’s Da Capo served as the living bridge, a satisfyingly schizophrenic collection that highlights the band’s initial energy (“Stephanie Knows Who,” “Seven and Seven Is”) with their emerging ornate melodicism and the full fruition of Lee’s tremendous songwriting (“Orange Skies,” “!Que Vida!” “She Comes In Colors”). By slowing the tempos, adding flute, clearing room for a cascading organ and Spanish guitar, and indulging Lee’s silky smooth vocals, the songs open in unforeseen directions. The sidelong jam “Revelation” is a 19-minute excursion that starts off tentatively with standard issue blues shouting but culminates in an inspired jazz-influenced, raga-style frenzy. It’s not as much of a revelation as, say, the album coming next, but it well demonstrates the band’s range.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Arthur Lee and his group of Los Angeles misfits dubbed Love transformed in front of everyone’s ears from an energetic punkish folk-rock group with their self-titled 1966 debut into an orchestrated psychedelic marvel with their third album, 1968’s Forever Changes. 1967’s Da Capo served as the living bridge, a satisfyingly schizophrenic collection that highlights the band’s initial energy (“Stephanie Knows Who,” “Seven and Seven Is”) with their emerging ornate melodicism and the full fruition of Lee’s tremendous songwriting (“Orange Skies,” “!Que Vida!” “She Comes In Colors”). By slowing the tempos, adding flute, clearing room for a cascading organ and Spanish guitar, and indulging Lee’s silky smooth vocals, the songs open in unforeseen directions. The sidelong jam “Revelation” is a 19-minute excursion that starts off tentatively with standard issue blues shouting but culminates in an inspired jazz-influenced, raga-style frenzy. It’s not as much of a revelation as, say, the album coming next, but it well demonstrates the band’s range.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

Leedude ,

Good stuff.

Very enjoyable. If you liked Forever Changes you'll like this. But Forever Changes is the superior album.

bugabooyoohoo ,

Love Love

Every time I go back to the music of Love I am surprised; their music is endlessly inventive, fun, even dada... in the best sense, which is the highest praise. But unlike dada, it's not afraid to smile or cry. It out-dadas dada... pray you don't scorn it. (P.S. 'Revelation' is a revelation... if you like Love, you'll be able to appreciate it. It doesn't prevent this album from being a classic... it's brilliant music for subtle ears.)

Rudynski ,

Underated band!

A lot of people talk about The Velvet Underground as the band with the odd and avant garde album and that they were just so cool. But, Love is so much better. Love isn't avant garde but when you're listening to the lyrics of Arthur Lee, one can't help but think he was trying to be. If not just plain different. But, it is absolutely refreshing. And one finds themselves guessing what word he's gonna use next in his stories. 7 and 7 is may be the hit off of Da Capo but I gotta tell you that each track is every bit of worthiness. My personal favorite track is She comes in Colors. The full sound and beautiful lyrics makes any songwriter gush. Obviously it did make some large impressions. The Rolling Stones loved the song so much that they took the idea and came up with She's a Rainbow. Using the line "She comes in colors". Then even though Madonna won't admit that she ripped the song off with her song Beautiful Stranger from the Austin Powers soundtrack mind you, one can easily see why this song is enjoyable. Orange Skies is a peppy little song that puts up a good fight to Lucy in the Skys with Diamonds. With the lyrics using cotton candy it makes one heck of a carnival experience. Stephanie knows Who and Que Vida are equally just as good. And Revelation at length is a dream to the ears. I think what also makes me like Love so much is that knowing that during the 60's and a rough road of times, they were one of the first integrated bands along with Booker T. & the MG's. And that I feel makes them even stronger because they were able to take the feelings out of soul and blues and psychedelia to a whole new level.

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