10 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Trumpeter Rick Braun put himself out there as a vocalist on Sings With Strings and Swingin’ in the Snow, but subsequent efforts (Can You Feel It, Around the Horn) found him resuming his instrumental focus. He continues that trend on Crossroads, singing through his mellifluous horn and involving trusted friends and associates, including keyboardist Philippe Saisse, acoustic guitarist Peter White (“Me and You”), electric guitarist Michael Thompson (the brilliant textures on “Family”), and drummer Gregg Bissonette (the Brazilian-tinged “Bahia”). Michael Jackson’s former keyboardist Greg Phillinganes makes tangy contributions to Braun’s Stevie Wonder cover “I Wish” (with Braun’s subtle plunger muting in the mix as well), while Braun’s teenage son Kyle capably handles the keyboard intro on “Versace on the Floor,” the closing Bruno Mars cover. Braun is restrained and elegant on much of the material, which is smartly produced and breezily grooving—though “Family” stands out for its contrasting pop/rock aesthetic and its simple infectious melody.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Trumpeter Rick Braun put himself out there as a vocalist on Sings With Strings and Swingin’ in the Snow, but subsequent efforts (Can You Feel It, Around the Horn) found him resuming his instrumental focus. He continues that trend on Crossroads, singing through his mellifluous horn and involving trusted friends and associates, including keyboardist Philippe Saisse, acoustic guitarist Peter White (“Me and You”), electric guitarist Michael Thompson (the brilliant textures on “Family”), and drummer Gregg Bissonette (the Brazilian-tinged “Bahia”). Michael Jackson’s former keyboardist Greg Phillinganes makes tangy contributions to Braun’s Stevie Wonder cover “I Wish” (with Braun’s subtle plunger muting in the mix as well), while Braun’s teenage son Kyle capably handles the keyboard intro on “Versace on the Floor,” the closing Bruno Mars cover. Braun is restrained and elegant on much of the material, which is smartly produced and breezily grooving—though “Family” stands out for its contrasting pop/rock aesthetic and its simple infectious melody.

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