12 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Riff-heavy ‘60s- and ‘70s-inspired bands like Graveyard, The Heavy Eyes, and Rival Sons are sprouting headbanging audiences both here and abroad, and Iowa’s Radio Moscow (whose first album was produced by The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach) is arguably one of the finest. Basically a duo led by skilled guitarist/drummer/vocalist Parker Griggs (joined here by bassist Zack Anderson), Radio Moscow churns up a roiling stew of psych- and blues-soaked rock ’n’ roll that sounds so authentic you expect whiffs of patchouli and pot smoke to waft from the speakers. Griggs has a gravelly, soulful voice belying his relative youth, and his guitarwork ranges from showy and flamethrowing to fluid and quietly confident. The Great Escape boogies, crunches, and stomps, and it roars with passion for a sound long out of vogue. This record is massive, and it’s saved (barely) from OD’ing on the goods by a few tracks that let it catch its breath. Good save.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Riff-heavy ‘60s- and ‘70s-inspired bands like Graveyard, The Heavy Eyes, and Rival Sons are sprouting headbanging audiences both here and abroad, and Iowa’s Radio Moscow (whose first album was produced by The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach) is arguably one of the finest. Basically a duo led by skilled guitarist/drummer/vocalist Parker Griggs (joined here by bassist Zack Anderson), Radio Moscow churns up a roiling stew of psych- and blues-soaked rock ’n’ roll that sounds so authentic you expect whiffs of patchouli and pot smoke to waft from the speakers. Griggs has a gravelly, soulful voice belying his relative youth, and his guitarwork ranges from showy and flamethrowing to fluid and quietly confident. The Great Escape boogies, crunches, and stomps, and it roars with passion for a sound long out of vogue. This record is massive, and it’s saved (barely) from OD’ing on the goods by a few tracks that let it catch its breath. Good save.

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