12 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Continuing with the fun and hijinks of Duncan Sheik's well-received Covers 80s, Remixed is exactly that and much more. Tunes once stripped down for reflection are built back up with layers of synths and vocals, plus unique production tricks that breathe more new life into tunes known by heart by Generation X members who remember when they bristled at being classified as such. The Max Tannone remix of The Smiths' "William, It Was Really Nothing" shades the tune toward techno, as if Depeche Mode had absconded with Johnny Marr's guitar. The mash-up producer performs serious surgery on the tune, overtaking Sheik's original acoustic rendition. Samantha Ronson's remix of The Cure's "Kyoto Song" pushes the beats to the breaking point, while Sheik himself turns in a synth-heavy mix of Lisa Loeb's "Stay" that retains his somber touch. "Shout," featuring Rachael Yamagata, flourishes into luminous Technicolor. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Continuing with the fun and hijinks of Duncan Sheik's well-received Covers 80s, Remixed is exactly that and much more. Tunes once stripped down for reflection are built back up with layers of synths and vocals, plus unique production tricks that breathe more new life into tunes known by heart by Generation X members who remember when they bristled at being classified as such. The Max Tannone remix of The Smiths' "William, It Was Really Nothing" shades the tune toward techno, as if Depeche Mode had absconded with Johnny Marr's guitar. The mash-up producer performs serious surgery on the tune, overtaking Sheik's original acoustic rendition. Samantha Ronson's remix of The Cure's "Kyoto Song" pushes the beats to the breaking point, while Sheik himself turns in a synth-heavy mix of Lisa Loeb's "Stay" that retains his somber touch. "Shout," featuring Rachael Yamagata, flourishes into luminous Technicolor. 

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