10 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As long as guitarist Andy Gill can lay down a guitar line and singer Jon King can rail against capitalism, there can be a Gang of Four. Sixteen years since their last studio effort, Gill and King hitch up bassist Thomas McNeice and drummer Mark Heaney and resurrect the sound that put these guys on the cutting edge at the onset of the ‘80s. In the interim, they’ve influenced innumerable groups, but there’s nothing quite like the seductive funk of “I Can’t Forget Your Lonely Face,” which sounds like David Bowie with serrated edges. “You’ll Never Pay for the Farm” has a driving and hypnotic grind to its discontent. “It Was Never Gonna Turn Out Too Good” works with electronically manipulated sounds. “She Said” rails with ominous radio tower interference. Gill’s guitar is particularly crisp for “You Don’t Have to Be Mad.” The band may be down to the original frontmen, but they still commit to their sonic and political convictions like the full band of old.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As long as guitarist Andy Gill can lay down a guitar line and singer Jon King can rail against capitalism, there can be a Gang of Four. Sixteen years since their last studio effort, Gill and King hitch up bassist Thomas McNeice and drummer Mark Heaney and resurrect the sound that put these guys on the cutting edge at the onset of the ‘80s. In the interim, they’ve influenced innumerable groups, but there’s nothing quite like the seductive funk of “I Can’t Forget Your Lonely Face,” which sounds like David Bowie with serrated edges. “You’ll Never Pay for the Farm” has a driving and hypnotic grind to its discontent. “It Was Never Gonna Turn Out Too Good” works with electronically manipulated sounds. “She Said” rails with ominous radio tower interference. Gill’s guitar is particularly crisp for “You Don’t Have to Be Mad.” The band may be down to the original frontmen, but they still commit to their sonic and political convictions like the full band of old.

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