15 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A great introduction to the band Young Marble Giants, this album was originally released in 1980 in what was likely an experimental moment of courage: punk had been birthed just a few years prior in a noisy, messy explosion of sound and image, and the new, post-punk movement was getting underway in the U.K. But was this too post-punk? Twee, sparse, airy, light … downright quiet, they were, this trio of bass, organ and detached, cool female vocals (the fourth member was a drum machine, largely responsible for the pervasive chill found throughout the proceedings). Considered a seminal record, this one and only full-length, studio recording from the band was released to much acclaim, allegedly contributing to the quick demise of the band. One listen to the perfect blend of irony and earnestness, fury and tenderness on just about any of these tracks should convince you of the band’s utterly unique standing (if you must shop around, try the galloping “Include Me Out,” the longing “Constantly Changing,” the cold and yet strangely emotional “Brand-New-Life”). YMG has influenced scores of bands in the Belle and Sebastian and Everything But the Girl schools of rock. Little did the band know – a quarter of a century ago – the mark they would leave on the musical map of pop culture. (If you are already a fan, be sure to seek out the Colossal Youth & Collected Works for everything the band ever recorded.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A great introduction to the band Young Marble Giants, this album was originally released in 1980 in what was likely an experimental moment of courage: punk had been birthed just a few years prior in a noisy, messy explosion of sound and image, and the new, post-punk movement was getting underway in the U.K. But was this too post-punk? Twee, sparse, airy, light … downright quiet, they were, this trio of bass, organ and detached, cool female vocals (the fourth member was a drum machine, largely responsible for the pervasive chill found throughout the proceedings). Considered a seminal record, this one and only full-length, studio recording from the band was released to much acclaim, allegedly contributing to the quick demise of the band. One listen to the perfect blend of irony and earnestness, fury and tenderness on just about any of these tracks should convince you of the band’s utterly unique standing (if you must shop around, try the galloping “Include Me Out,” the longing “Constantly Changing,” the cold and yet strangely emotional “Brand-New-Life”). YMG has influenced scores of bands in the Belle and Sebastian and Everything But the Girl schools of rock. Little did the band know – a quarter of a century ago – the mark they would leave on the musical map of pop culture. (If you are already a fan, be sure to seek out the Colossal Youth & Collected Works for everything the band ever recorded.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

IzariahJ ,

SwAg

Great album. discovered them after listening to the penguin cafe orchestra and finding out simon jeffs (leader of the penguins) had some sort of connection to The Weekend (side project of YMG)…check out the weekend if you like this band, I personally like them a little better then Young Marble Giants.

VegasDJ1 ,

No Wonder I Had Never Heard of Them

In 31 years of being a DJ, I had never heard of this band until I read the New Wave Encyclopedia in 2015, a few years after I retired. Maybe it's because I didn't start my career until 1982, but the album almost sounds like one long song with 15 breaks.

T Raygun ,

Wonderful

I can't believe it took me up until this point to discover this album. I am going to be recommending it to all my friends.

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