10 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

CoCo Beware, the 2011 debut by the Brooklyn indie rock quintet Caveman, is a seductively somber and beautifully human-sounding album that plays with equal parts wide-eyed wonder and smoldering self-doubt. “A Country’s King of Dreams” sets the tone with slow, roomy drums that pulse over keyboard drones as acoustic guitars and electric six-string feedback balance each other out. The following “Decide” grooves slowly on a subtly buoyant rhythm that sits back and lets the flowing vocal melodies drive. The guitars on “My Time” resonate coolly with vintage wooden tones that pedal like a Velvet Underground tune. Contrasting this classic New York sound are the Pacific Northwest–style nasal-toned vocals of singer Matthew Iwanusa. Throughout CoCo Beware, he coos with a lullaby-friendly voice; check out “December 28th,” where he sings shadowy harmonies so sublime that they blend in with the accompaniment like another instrument. Those lush four-part harmonies play a pretty big part on Caveman’s debut, most noticeably on the soothing “Easy Water” and the closing dirge “My Room.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

CoCo Beware, the 2011 debut by the Brooklyn indie rock quintet Caveman, is a seductively somber and beautifully human-sounding album that plays with equal parts wide-eyed wonder and smoldering self-doubt. “A Country’s King of Dreams” sets the tone with slow, roomy drums that pulse over keyboard drones as acoustic guitars and electric six-string feedback balance each other out. The following “Decide” grooves slowly on a subtly buoyant rhythm that sits back and lets the flowing vocal melodies drive. The guitars on “My Time” resonate coolly with vintage wooden tones that pedal like a Velvet Underground tune. Contrasting this classic New York sound are the Pacific Northwest–style nasal-toned vocals of singer Matthew Iwanusa. Throughout CoCo Beware, he coos with a lullaby-friendly voice; check out “December 28th,” where he sings shadowy harmonies so sublime that they blend in with the accompaniment like another instrument. Those lush four-part harmonies play a pretty big part on Caveman’s debut, most noticeably on the soothing “Easy Water” and the closing dirge “My Room.”

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