16 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coast to Coast Carpet of Love is the first of two simultaneous October 2007 releases by the ridiculously prolific Robert Pollard (the other being the slightly more abrasive Standard Gargoyle Decisions). Between Guided By Voices and his countless side and solo projects, Pollard has released somewhere in the ballpark of 50 albums. Obviously, the quality varies. Pollard is never one to throw an idea away, so half-sketches such as “Penumbra” and “I Clap for Strangers” sit next to more fully-realized pop songs such as “Miles Under the Skin” and “Slow Hamilton.” But the undisciplined mish-mosh is part of Pollard’s underground appeal, where his lo-fi pop experiments are seen as part of the process and expression of the man. Besides, like any excessive collection, what should remain is never clear. One listener’s clutter is another listener’s charm. The near two-minutes of “Nicely Now” may seem like another clever rewrite from the Pollard catalog as filtered through the Anglo-pop of Robyn Hitchcock, but it might be the one that resonates most. Pollard simply overwhelms the listener into submission.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coast to Coast Carpet of Love is the first of two simultaneous October 2007 releases by the ridiculously prolific Robert Pollard (the other being the slightly more abrasive Standard Gargoyle Decisions). Between Guided By Voices and his countless side and solo projects, Pollard has released somewhere in the ballpark of 50 albums. Obviously, the quality varies. Pollard is never one to throw an idea away, so half-sketches such as “Penumbra” and “I Clap for Strangers” sit next to more fully-realized pop songs such as “Miles Under the Skin” and “Slow Hamilton.” But the undisciplined mish-mosh is part of Pollard’s underground appeal, where his lo-fi pop experiments are seen as part of the process and expression of the man. Besides, like any excessive collection, what should remain is never clear. One listener’s clutter is another listener’s charm. The near two-minutes of “Nicely Now” may seem like another clever rewrite from the Pollard catalog as filtered through the Anglo-pop of Robyn Hitchcock, but it might be the one that resonates most. Pollard simply overwhelms the listener into submission.

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