13 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Avett Brothers long ago figured out how to fill the corners of cavernous arenas with earnest energy using primarily acoustic instruments. Seth Avett gave advance warning via social media that this album would represent a socially conscious turn for him, his brother Scott, and their longtime bandmates. They push the folk and pop-punk threads in their music to galvanizing extremes on this Rick Rubin-produced record, while treating national concerns with the warmheartedness that they usually reserve for inner and interpersonal yearnings. The performances are often buoyant (“Locked Up,” “High Steppin’”) and the writing openly emotional, but several songs (including “Tell the Truth,” “New Woman’s World,” and “We Americans”) give priority to expressions of penitence. “I am a son of Uncle Sam, and I struggle to understand the good and evil,” Seth sings, his delivery crisp and purposeful, “but I’m doing the best I can, in a place built on stolen land with stolen people.” During dense folk ballads like “Long Story Short” and “C Sections and Railway Trestles,” the stories convey a sense of caretaking responsibility for younger generations, the Avetts striving to make all of these gestures feel ennobling.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Avett Brothers long ago figured out how to fill the corners of cavernous arenas with earnest energy using primarily acoustic instruments. Seth Avett gave advance warning via social media that this album would represent a socially conscious turn for him, his brother Scott, and their longtime bandmates. They push the folk and pop-punk threads in their music to galvanizing extremes on this Rick Rubin-produced record, while treating national concerns with the warmheartedness that they usually reserve for inner and interpersonal yearnings. The performances are often buoyant (“Locked Up,” “High Steppin’”) and the writing openly emotional, but several songs (including “Tell the Truth,” “New Woman’s World,” and “We Americans”) give priority to expressions of penitence. “I am a son of Uncle Sam, and I struggle to understand the good and evil,” Seth sings, his delivery crisp and purposeful, “but I’m doing the best I can, in a place built on stolen land with stolen people.” During dense folk ballads like “Long Story Short” and “C Sections and Railway Trestles,” the stories convey a sense of caretaking responsibility for younger generations, the Avetts striving to make all of these gestures feel ennobling.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.3 out of 5
216 Ratings

216 Ratings

kastjog ,

Their music, their message. Get over it.

Not my favorite Avett album from first listen, but I have to laugh at all the one-star reviews from gun enthusiasts. Art has ALWAYS been politically informed, and music is no exception. If you object to that, check out the easy-listening station — or just go spend some time in an elevator. You’ll find all the message-free muzak you want.

How unfortunate that these poor people have nothing better to do with their time than rate and review an album they in all likelihood haven’t listened to just because its subject matter challenges them. Bless their hearts.

Js708 ,

Why

I love the Avett bro’s. That’s why I gave this album 4 stars. But this is truly a weak offering. Musically and lyrically. What I loved was the simple, under produced, raw folky bluegrass music. With introspective songs about wonderment, life, love, family, and the journey. Beautiful harmonies ringing out near prophetic lyrics that anyone could identify with, over simple catchy (beatle-esque) melodies. Listening to this album with the social justice preaching... I just wonder what happened. I miss you guys :(
By the way I do love the first song. It rocks! It’s different then the folk band I fell in love with. But in a good way

CRM302 ,

It’s not political

It’s factual

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