13 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Diagnosed with a fatal cancer, 77-year-old Lee Hazlewood went about putting together his final album. An old-school maverick who enjoyed several hits with Nancy Sinatra in the ‘60s and received plaudits from the alternative rock crowd in later years, Hazlewood never seemed fazed or concerned with his rising or falling fortunes and doesn’t allow for sentimental moments despite the dimming of the day. His stoic demeanor lends a cool, detached drama to everything he touches and this final collection is every bit as weird and unpredictable as the man himself. “Nothing” begins things with a comedic deadpan, as everything is reduced to, well, nothing. The ‘70s Dave Loggins lite-rock hit “Please Come to Boston” is revived in a smooth, uncampy duet. Hazlewood’s “Some Velvet Morning” is reprised in abbreviated form with a vocal from his granddaughter, while “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” is updated with guitar legend Duane Eddy on lead guitar. Hazlewood turns political for “Baghdad Knights” and goes for a quick waltz with “Fred Freud.” Spirited until the end.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Diagnosed with a fatal cancer, 77-year-old Lee Hazlewood went about putting together his final album. An old-school maverick who enjoyed several hits with Nancy Sinatra in the ‘60s and received plaudits from the alternative rock crowd in later years, Hazlewood never seemed fazed or concerned with his rising or falling fortunes and doesn’t allow for sentimental moments despite the dimming of the day. His stoic demeanor lends a cool, detached drama to everything he touches and this final collection is every bit as weird and unpredictable as the man himself. “Nothing” begins things with a comedic deadpan, as everything is reduced to, well, nothing. The ‘70s Dave Loggins lite-rock hit “Please Come to Boston” is revived in a smooth, uncampy duet. Hazlewood’s “Some Velvet Morning” is reprised in abbreviated form with a vocal from his granddaughter, while “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” is updated with guitar legend Duane Eddy on lead guitar. Hazlewood turns political for “Baghdad Knights” and goes for a quick waltz with “Fred Freud.” Spirited until the end.

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