11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This English chanteuse takes her time and immerses herself in placid, soothing soundscapes that compliment her smooth, pretty voice to the point where you might miss the emotional insecurities that run just beneath the surface. On just her third solo album since her 1999 debut, Dido continues her streak of attractive adult-contemporary pop. “Don’t Believe In Love” and “Never Want to Say It’s Love” use Jon Brion’s creamy keyboards and steadying production hand to hide the tough questions facing lovers at any point of introspection. Brian Eno adds his extra flourishes to “Grafton Street,” a six-minute ethereal moan through flute-inspired fields of remorse. Mick Fleetwood, Citizen Cope and Questlove from the Roots make cameo appearances that strengthen the tunes in subtle ways. But it’s still Dido’s show. It’s her melancholy that shadows the sweet melodies of “It Comes and It Goes” and “Northern Skies” and paces the slow mourn of the piano ballad “Look No Further.”  “Us 2 Little Gods” adds an extra skip-step for balance, while “Let’s Do the Things We Normally Do” pushes through with a nightclub ambience, but it’s only a diversion from the ominous clouds that circle her existence.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This English chanteuse takes her time and immerses herself in placid, soothing soundscapes that compliment her smooth, pretty voice to the point where you might miss the emotional insecurities that run just beneath the surface. On just her third solo album since her 1999 debut, Dido continues her streak of attractive adult-contemporary pop. “Don’t Believe In Love” and “Never Want to Say It’s Love” use Jon Brion’s creamy keyboards and steadying production hand to hide the tough questions facing lovers at any point of introspection. Brian Eno adds his extra flourishes to “Grafton Street,” a six-minute ethereal moan through flute-inspired fields of remorse. Mick Fleetwood, Citizen Cope and Questlove from the Roots make cameo appearances that strengthen the tunes in subtle ways. But it’s still Dido’s show. It’s her melancholy that shadows the sweet melodies of “It Comes and It Goes” and “Northern Skies” and paces the slow mourn of the piano ballad “Look No Further.”  “Us 2 Little Gods” adds an extra skip-step for balance, while “Let’s Do the Things We Normally Do” pushes through with a nightclub ambience, but it’s only a diversion from the ominous clouds that circle her existence.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.1 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

virginiaisforluvrs ,

Mellow and Subdued

These songs seem more airy and subdued than White Flag (an album which I absolutely love!). A few songs sound very reminiscent of Zero 7, which is not a bad thing. I love Dido so I'm glad that she has another great album, and I hope that I will love these songs over time.

PacificK ,

Not for the Bubbly.

As a devoted fan of Dido's I have to say that I am shocked her newest album is receiving such low ratings. Safe Trip Home is quickly becoming my favorite, a feat not easily accomplished with the albums that she has produced. Not only does she use a variety of instruments as well as a song featuring Citizen Cope, but the lyrics that she has written (and yes she wrote ALL of the songs) are beautiful. I must warn that if you are looking for a pop-like album with fluff and feel-good songs then this may not be an album for you. If, however, you are looking for truly wonderful lyrics and musical creativity then support Dido and buy it! As for the remarks that all the songs sound the same, this is absurd and it takes no time at all to quickly realize the individuality of each song.

TheSaintTemplar ,

Hauntingly Beautiful

Once again, Dido manages to present the best side of human beings. In this world filled with nonsense, she adds calm. This, long awaited album is a brilliant repository of life expressed through songs of sanctuary. Excellent vocals and comforting harmonies.

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