8 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In taking a quick glance at the program of the Elmo Hope Trio, a 1959 recording originally issued on David Axelrod’s HiFi Jazz label, one might not be prepared for the extraordinary individuality at play. With the exception of the standard “Like Someone In Love,” all of the tunes here are originals by the pianist, presenting slightly less frantic bop in explorations by a cooperative unit with Los Angeles stalwarts Jimmy Bond (bass) and Frank Butler (drums). Certainly owing some to Bud Powell, Hope teeters between Monk’s architecture and Herbie Nichols’ painterliness, especially on the opening “B’s a Plenty.” “Something for Kenny” (a.k.a. “I Would if I Could”) is most notable for its spotlight on Butler’s drums, where he gets solo space to explore timbral patterns using a broad range of the kit as well as his fingers and palms — though Hope and Bond certainly get stretching room, too. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

In taking a quick glance at the program of the Elmo Hope Trio, a 1959 recording originally issued on David Axelrod’s HiFi Jazz label, one might not be prepared for the extraordinary individuality at play. With the exception of the standard “Like Someone In Love,” all of the tunes here are originals by the pianist, presenting slightly less frantic bop in explorations by a cooperative unit with Los Angeles stalwarts Jimmy Bond (bass) and Frank Butler (drums). Certainly owing some to Bud Powell, Hope teeters between Monk’s architecture and Herbie Nichols’ painterliness, especially on the opening “B’s a Plenty.” “Something for Kenny” (a.k.a. “I Would if I Could”) is most notable for its spotlight on Butler’s drums, where he gets solo space to explore timbral patterns using a broad range of the kit as well as his fingers and palms — though Hope and Bond certainly get stretching room, too. 

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