12 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Bread On the Waters (1970), Bread made the shift from promising singer/songwriter trio into hit-making commercial powerhouse. In the process, David Gates became the acknowledged leader of the group thanks to his penchant for crafting winsome pop ballads like “Make It With You.” Elegantly sensual yet wholesome in tone, the song gave Bread the first of many high-charting singles. Yet there was more to the group than such soft-rock excursions. James Griffin’s contributions to the album — particularly “”Why Do You Keep Me Waiting” and “Call On Me” — add a welcome dash of blues-rock energy. Guitarist Robb Royer’s inventive parts provide grit and texture, while drummer Mike Botts proves his versatility throughout. Still, it’s Gates who’s the star of this show — such tracks as the aggressive “Blue Satin Pillow” and the reflective “The Other Side of Life” show he could step beyond the romantic balladeer’s role. On The Waters is a thoroughly likeable sophomore effort; you might say that Bread rose to the occasion of proving itself a band of substance.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Bread On the Waters (1970), Bread made the shift from promising singer/songwriter trio into hit-making commercial powerhouse. In the process, David Gates became the acknowledged leader of the group thanks to his penchant for crafting winsome pop ballads like “Make It With You.” Elegantly sensual yet wholesome in tone, the song gave Bread the first of many high-charting singles. Yet there was more to the group than such soft-rock excursions. James Griffin’s contributions to the album — particularly “”Why Do You Keep Me Waiting” and “Call On Me” — add a welcome dash of blues-rock energy. Guitarist Robb Royer’s inventive parts provide grit and texture, while drummer Mike Botts proves his versatility throughout. Still, it’s Gates who’s the star of this show — such tracks as the aggressive “Blue Satin Pillow” and the reflective “The Other Side of Life” show he could step beyond the romantic balladeer’s role. On The Waters is a thoroughly likeable sophomore effort; you might say that Bread rose to the occasion of proving itself a band of substance.

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