12 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a Far Western note of plaintiveness running through the tracks of Brandi Carlile’s 2006 self-titled debut, and critics deservedly gushed over this Washington State-born artist’s ache-wracked vocals and sparse, heart-tugging songwriting. Fundamentally, her first album is a country release — but Brandi Carlile’s stark production and often bleak tone is as far from the genre’s current mainstream as Nashville is from Spokane. As a singer, Carlile invites comparisons with a young Bonnie Raitt, delivering her lyrics with a bluesy throb accented with keening falsetto touches. Tracks like “What Can I Say” (written by co-producer Phil Hanseroth), “In My Own Eyes” and “Fall Apart Again” evoke late-night barroom reveries and lonesome drives across empty landscapes, and the wounded bravado of “Happy” and quiet desolation of “Tragedy” (the latter a torchy ballad recalling k.d. laing’s early work) are especially haunting. Carlile strikes a more aggressive stance on “Closer to You,” riding atop a galloping guitar line. Worth special mention is her darkly reflective cover of Elton John’s “Sixty Years On,” included as a bonus track.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a Far Western note of plaintiveness running through the tracks of Brandi Carlile’s 2006 self-titled debut, and critics deservedly gushed over this Washington State-born artist’s ache-wracked vocals and sparse, heart-tugging songwriting. Fundamentally, her first album is a country release — but Brandi Carlile’s stark production and often bleak tone is as far from the genre’s current mainstream as Nashville is from Spokane. As a singer, Carlile invites comparisons with a young Bonnie Raitt, delivering her lyrics with a bluesy throb accented with keening falsetto touches. Tracks like “What Can I Say” (written by co-producer Phil Hanseroth), “In My Own Eyes” and “Fall Apart Again” evoke late-night barroom reveries and lonesome drives across empty landscapes, and the wounded bravado of “Happy” and quiet desolation of “Tragedy” (the latter a torchy ballad recalling k.d. laing’s early work) are especially haunting. Carlile strikes a more aggressive stance on “Closer to You,” riding atop a galloping guitar line. Worth special mention is her darkly reflective cover of Elton John’s “Sixty Years On,” included as a bonus track.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
197 Ratings

197 Ratings

lulu3192 ,

One Word: Amazing!!!

This cd is absolutely amazing! Every song is amazing, soulful, and full of emotion. I just saw her in Aspen and she is one of the only artists that I have seen where she is better live then on a cd. I highly recommend seeing her live, the show is just amazing. She does a rendition of the Jonny Cash Folsom Prison song, brought the house down. Like I said only one word: AMAZING!!!

ceule ,

Wow... get ready for something raw and refreshing!

I saw Brandi Carlile open for Train in April of this year... the silence that fell over this sold out concert when she sang "Follow" and then "Hallelujah" gives me goosebumps revisiting the moments. Fantastic raw passionate voice... nothing fake about this young lady. You can hear the influences of Jeff Buckley to Melissa Ethridge... great blend and all her own. Enjoy it all.

keco12356 ,

Amazing.

I purchased this album after I purchased her album "The Story" and was shocked to find that this album is just as amazing as the latter. Wow. The rich harmonies and passionate lyrics and of course Carlile's wonderful voice makes this album one for any other artist to envy. Every song is unique and delightful, and I do honestly believe that I could listen to just Brandi Carlile's songs for the rest of my life and always find something new and enthralling within the music.
100000% worth the money.

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