14 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The National’s steady, majestic indie rock never seemed as exquisitely clear as it did on Boxer, an album about young adults with good jobs who made the right decisions but still can’t seem to be happy. While Matt Berninger’s delivery can be moody and his lyrics dense (“Another uninnocent, elegant fall/Into the unmagnificent lives of adults,” goes a snippet of “Mistaken for Strangers”), the anthemic sweep of the music is powerfully direct.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The National’s steady, majestic indie rock never seemed as exquisitely clear as it did on Boxer, an album about young adults with good jobs who made the right decisions but still can’t seem to be happy. While Matt Berninger’s delivery can be moody and his lyrics dense (“Another uninnocent, elegant fall/Into the unmagnificent lives of adults,” goes a snippet of “Mistaken for Strangers”), the anthemic sweep of the music is powerfully direct.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

Texture ,

Plant album in rotation, water daily, watch it grow on you.

The National are not conventional, you cannot breeze over this, it's too clever. Because after several times of constant listening, you will on chance see a random word, hear a random note, and then without realizing it you can't get one of these tunes to leave you alone. Songs on this album that were at one point less than desireable completely open up to you when you on a whim and you realize just how magnificent the lyircs are, how characteristic the guitar is, how pounding the drums sound. And then my friend, you will be hooked, and keep coming back for more.

Johnny Bus ,

Majestic

This album feels like a solo, midnight car ride. It's one of those rare pieces that doesn't drop its hold on you through all 14 tracks. Sacrifices initial listenability, simplicity and overall general appeal for layered and efficient sounds, rich vocals and lyrics that strike deep. For anyone who tries to find music that puts their wandering thoughts into beautiful poetry.

marge-aaron ,

The sound

I started listening to the National with Alligator, an amazing album. I got my hands on some of their older material, just wanting more of their music. Well now the wait is over, and they have delivered the goods again. The sound is a little more subdued than Alligator, with less of the focus on the guitars. However, the band incorporates piano this time around. Bryan Devendorf's drumming is better than ever, and provides a nice counter to Matt Berninger's dreary baritone. Overall, it's another incredible album for The National.

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