9 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bourbonitis Blues appeared in 1999 as a stopgap collection between 1996’s With These Hands and 2001’s A Man Under the Influence. Despite being a collection of outtakes and live tracks, it offers a revealing look into Alejandro Escovedo’s influences, tracing a personal musical history that touches on glam, punk, and country. “Irene Wilde” and “Amsterdam” are two well-chosen and carefully-crafted songs by Ian Hunter and John Cale, respectively. Each addresses a woman who changes the life of the narrator, and Escovedo renders both with the rich and mournful backing of his well-loved string quartet. “California Blues” features The Mekons’ John Langford in a send-up of the Jimmie Rodgers standard, while the Velvet Underground’s “Pale Blue Eyes” is treated as a lonely country lament, with contributions from Escovedo’s Bloodshot labelmate Kelly Hogan and a single forlorn violin. For everything the cover versions tell us about Escovedo, his rock’n’roll originals steal the show. “Everybody Loves Me” is a sweaty swamp blues, while “Guilty” is a glorious serving of Stones-ish highway rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bourbonitis Blues appeared in 1999 as a stopgap collection between 1996’s With These Hands and 2001’s A Man Under the Influence. Despite being a collection of outtakes and live tracks, it offers a revealing look into Alejandro Escovedo’s influences, tracing a personal musical history that touches on glam, punk, and country. “Irene Wilde” and “Amsterdam” are two well-chosen and carefully-crafted songs by Ian Hunter and John Cale, respectively. Each addresses a woman who changes the life of the narrator, and Escovedo renders both with the rich and mournful backing of his well-loved string quartet. “California Blues” features The Mekons’ John Langford in a send-up of the Jimmie Rodgers standard, while the Velvet Underground’s “Pale Blue Eyes” is treated as a lonely country lament, with contributions from Escovedo’s Bloodshot labelmate Kelly Hogan and a single forlorn violin. For everything the cover versions tell us about Escovedo, his rock’n’roll originals steal the show. “Everybody Loves Me” is a sweaty swamp blues, while “Guilty” is a glorious serving of Stones-ish highway rock.

TITLE TIME

More By Alejandro Escovedo

You May Also Like