15 Songs, 1 Hour 4 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With 1987’s Electric, the Cult transformed themselves into a guitar-heavy hard rock band that quoted the riffs and history of the genre with an unapologetic swagger. Singer Ian Astbury took his classic rock pose to its logical conclusion, singing as Jim Morrison’s replacement in a reformation of the original Doors. With guitarist Billy Duffy adding his arsenal of classic guitar riffs, the Cult treat 2007 just as they treated 1987, with few nods to current trends and a dedication to the timeless hard rock/ heavy metal poses and riffs that have kept the music alive for decades. The title track doesn’t catch the fire it intends, but “Citizens” uses a swirling riff and a desperate rasp to get things on track for the buckling Guns n’ Roses inspired “Diamonds” and the Rolling Stones inspired “Dirty Little Rockstar.” Astbury’s vocals border on parody when he turns the vibrato on high and, granted, nothing new is invented throughout this grinding process. But “Holy Mountain” offers the duo’s softer side (bassist and drummer are hired hands) and “I Assassin” boogies past with dedication. The Cult are determined to rage against the dying of the light.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With 1987’s Electric, the Cult transformed themselves into a guitar-heavy hard rock band that quoted the riffs and history of the genre with an unapologetic swagger. Singer Ian Astbury took his classic rock pose to its logical conclusion, singing as Jim Morrison’s replacement in a reformation of the original Doors. With guitarist Billy Duffy adding his arsenal of classic guitar riffs, the Cult treat 2007 just as they treated 1987, with few nods to current trends and a dedication to the timeless hard rock/ heavy metal poses and riffs that have kept the music alive for decades. The title track doesn’t catch the fire it intends, but “Citizens” uses a swirling riff and a desperate rasp to get things on track for the buckling Guns n’ Roses inspired “Diamonds” and the Rolling Stones inspired “Dirty Little Rockstar.” Astbury’s vocals border on parody when he turns the vibrato on high and, granted, nothing new is invented throughout this grinding process. But “Holy Mountain” offers the duo’s softer side (bassist and drummer are hired hands) and “I Assassin” boogies past with dedication. The Cult are determined to rage against the dying of the light.

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