10 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The London Suede (known simply as Suede in the U.K.) never made a mainstream breakthrough in the U.S., as the early-'90s rise of grunge usurped whatever thunder these English glam boys might have had coming to them. Still, the band strung together a charming career with plenty of first-rate pop music that alternative channels very much appreciated. Then, creative missteps and personal issues rendered Suede cooked. Reunion shows in 2010 pointed the way to new material. Bloodsports features the Suede lineup from the Coming Up album, where Richard Oakes handles Bernard Butler's lead guitar and piano parts and Neil Codling takes a more pressing role as the main keyboardist. Brett Anderson is in fine voice and playing, for the most part, like the cheeky young lad he once was. "Barriers" throws out a kinetic kick worthy of David Bowie, while "lemonade is sipped in Belgian rooms" and the years melt away. "Sabotage" paints a somber mood worth reflecting on, as Anderson is again a tortured man obsessed with controlling a woman. "Faultlines" completes the melancholia with a grand sound that's simply sublime.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The London Suede (known simply as Suede in the U.K.) never made a mainstream breakthrough in the U.S., as the early-'90s rise of grunge usurped whatever thunder these English glam boys might have had coming to them. Still, the band strung together a charming career with plenty of first-rate pop music that alternative channels very much appreciated. Then, creative missteps and personal issues rendered Suede cooked. Reunion shows in 2010 pointed the way to new material. Bloodsports features the Suede lineup from the Coming Up album, where Richard Oakes handles Bernard Butler's lead guitar and piano parts and Neil Codling takes a more pressing role as the main keyboardist. Brett Anderson is in fine voice and playing, for the most part, like the cheeky young lad he once was. "Barriers" throws out a kinetic kick worthy of David Bowie, while "lemonade is sipped in Belgian rooms" and the years melt away. "Sabotage" paints a somber mood worth reflecting on, as Anderson is again a tortured man obsessed with controlling a woman. "Faultlines" completes the melancholia with a grand sound that's simply sublime.

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