9 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over the years the Cure touched on many different styles. They’d started as a punk-pop group that receded into ethereal despair that then mutated into raging goth and suddenly discovered uplifting dancefloor-friendly pop and ‘80s-90s psychedelic shimmers. But Cure critics and fans always favored a delicate blend of singer Robert Smith’s pop instincts and his grandiose epic visions. Smith knew this and posited 2000’s Bloodflowers as the final part of a trilogy that included 1982’s Pornography and 1988’s Disintegration. Again, he would indulge in songs that took five-plus minutes to sufficiently unfold and that dwelled in the group’s slower, hypnotic range. He succeeded, since “Out of This World,” the 11-minute “Watching Me Fall,” and “The Last Day of Summer” work over their guitar and keyboard riffs with a death grip’s finality. These are not songs meant to be taken lightly and their intense emotionalism against the Cure’s unyielding wall of sound — sometimes psychedelic, always brooding — makes for solid Goth throughout.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over the years the Cure touched on many different styles. They’d started as a punk-pop group that receded into ethereal despair that then mutated into raging goth and suddenly discovered uplifting dancefloor-friendly pop and ‘80s-90s psychedelic shimmers. But Cure critics and fans always favored a delicate blend of singer Robert Smith’s pop instincts and his grandiose epic visions. Smith knew this and posited 2000’s Bloodflowers as the final part of a trilogy that included 1982’s Pornography and 1988’s Disintegration. Again, he would indulge in songs that took five-plus minutes to sufficiently unfold and that dwelled in the group’s slower, hypnotic range. He succeeded, since “Out of This World,” the 11-minute “Watching Me Fall,” and “The Last Day of Summer” work over their guitar and keyboard riffs with a death grip’s finality. These are not songs meant to be taken lightly and their intense emotionalism against the Cure’s unyielding wall of sound — sometimes psychedelic, always brooding — makes for solid Goth throughout.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
76 Ratings

76 Ratings

MichaelQ ,

the Cure's best

.... oh I need to say a bit more ... Look this album probably isn't going to convert you if you aren't a fan. It's not immediate by any means - it takes a few listens to fall in love with it. It's passionate, romantic, blessed, dreamy - a work of art... Those that love it will know what I mean.

dadavoodoo ,

Like fine wine....

Like fine wine the Crue gets better wit time. This is part 3 of the great Crue CD. Down lod this one just to get "Watching me Fall". Like All the best Cure it is full for dark palse that only Mr. Smith can see. This is what age can do for you a an artest, make you grow!

blankmw ,

The Cure Keeps On Giving

I was pleasantly suprised to hear this album. I LOVE the Cure and have been listening to them for over 20 years. I wasn't so sure that they'd keep being able to deliver, but, I like this release almost as much as Kiss Me, Disintegration and Wild Mood Swings. Great lyrics and classic Cure sound with a new, reverby kind of hypnotic rhythym! Kind of a shaky feel. Last Day of Summer and Watching Me Fall are new classics.

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