10 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bunny’s first solo release following his departure from Bob Marley’s original Wailers band in 1973 is a stark statement of Rastafarian principles. The album’s title track and “Fighting Against Conviction” speak eloquently to the social humiliation and criminal persecution that Rastas faced in Jamaica. Despite their heavy lyrics, “The Oppressed Song” and “Rasta Man” have a bluesy, bittersweet quality refined by crisp brass arrangements and earthy hand percussion. On par with Marley’s best mid-'70s work, Bunny’s solo steps were giant.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bunny’s first solo release following his departure from Bob Marley’s original Wailers band in 1973 is a stark statement of Rastafarian principles. The album’s title track and “Fighting Against Conviction” speak eloquently to the social humiliation and criminal persecution that Rastas faced in Jamaica. Despite their heavy lyrics, “The Oppressed Song” and “Rasta Man” have a bluesy, bittersweet quality refined by crisp brass arrangements and earthy hand percussion. On par with Marley’s best mid-'70s work, Bunny’s solo steps were giant.

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