10 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

For their fourth studio album, Black Sabbath expanded their sound to include the unlikely ballad “Changes,” which featured guitarist Tony Iommi on piano and the Mellotron he had taught himself to play while partying in the Bel Air mansion that the entire band lived in during the making of the album in Los Angeles. Such craziness was standard-issue for the era, and the trippy-indulgent instrumental “FX,” the warped time signatures of “Cornucopia,” and the cocaine-praising “Snowblind” further exposed and reflected the tenor of the times. Though this album took longer than usual to make, it features some of the band's best music. The opening “Wheels of Confusion/The Straightener” includes both the standard heavy Sabbath riffs and a complex instrumental jam over its eight minutes. The churning “Tomorrow’s Dream” didn’t chart as a single, but bands of Sabbath’s unusual heaviness were clearly album artists without pop-chart concerns. Other key tracks like “Supernaut,” “St. Vitus Dance," and “Under the Sun/Every Day Comes and Goes” further cemented their reputation as the band writing the rules of heavy metal as they went along.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

For their fourth studio album, Black Sabbath expanded their sound to include the unlikely ballad “Changes,” which featured guitarist Tony Iommi on piano and the Mellotron he had taught himself to play while partying in the Bel Air mansion that the entire band lived in during the making of the album in Los Angeles. Such craziness was standard-issue for the era, and the trippy-indulgent instrumental “FX,” the warped time signatures of “Cornucopia,” and the cocaine-praising “Snowblind” further exposed and reflected the tenor of the times. Though this album took longer than usual to make, it features some of the band's best music. The opening “Wheels of Confusion/The Straightener” includes both the standard heavy Sabbath riffs and a complex instrumental jam over its eight minutes. The churning “Tomorrow’s Dream” didn’t chart as a single, but bands of Sabbath’s unusual heaviness were clearly album artists without pop-chart concerns. Other key tracks like “Supernaut,” “St. Vitus Dance," and “Under the Sun/Every Day Comes and Goes” further cemented their reputation as the band writing the rules of heavy metal as they went along.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
106 Ratings

106 Ratings

Slyte_Malfunction ,

Buy the album, not select tracks

This is my first time listening to the whole album front to back, and some songs I never heard before. Young folk like me: buy the whole album, sit down and listen to the whole album. It's an experience very unlike modern records where basically every song is a single; no, here they're all great songs but they're better together. Don't just turn on a song quick while you have a couple minutes in the car. Go to your room, put on a nice pair of headphones, let the music drown out all distractions, and just let it take you on a journey. That's how you listen to classics like this.

Hbzbop ,

You'll be straining to hear!

If you're looking for remastered , louder versions do not buy from iTunes. The first six sabbath albums are awesome but these are not up to par with their counterparts remasters(I.e. Zeppelin,Beatles, Stones, etc) . The 2 disc set released Symptom of the Universe has much more contemporary sound! Save your $.!!

CommendedSphinx ,

Great car jams!

This album is great and is certainly one I headbang to in my car on long trips. Hell I do that on the way to the store just down the street!

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