10 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Stones awoke with a start from their psychedelic dream, both musically and spiritually. Beggars Banquet is the sound of that start, a decisive move toward their roots that would color the next five or so gloriously creative years. The record is best known, of course, for the brazen statements "Sympathy for the Devil" and "Street Fighting Man," but its skepticism and humor pervade nearly every cut. "No Expectations" is more proof of Jagger and Richards' ability to deliver heartrending ballads, while a cover of the Rev. Robert Wilkins' "Prodigal Son" shows how commandingly they'd mastered pre-electric blues. Even at its lightest, this is tough, smart music that remains endlessly listenable and challenging. Those wondering how they got to be called the greatest could begin learning the lesson here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Stones awoke with a start from their psychedelic dream, both musically and spiritually. Beggars Banquet is the sound of that start, a decisive move toward their roots that would color the next five or so gloriously creative years. The record is best known, of course, for the brazen statements "Sympathy for the Devil" and "Street Fighting Man," but its skepticism and humor pervade nearly every cut. "No Expectations" is more proof of Jagger and Richards' ability to deliver heartrending ballads, while a cover of the Rev. Robert Wilkins' "Prodigal Son" shows how commandingly they'd mastered pre-electric blues. Even at its lightest, this is tough, smart music that remains endlessly listenable and challenging. Those wondering how they got to be called the greatest could begin learning the lesson here.

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