Editors’ Notes The three sonatas of Beethoven’s Opus 12, written for violin and piano, are brimful of wit. But below the sparkling surface, these early period gems are master classes in musical craftsmanship, as Beethoven places both players on equal terms. In the opening movement of Sonata No. 2, piano and violin swap ideas in exquisite, endlessly inventive musical dialogue, while in the Adagio of Sonata No. 3—in a moment of inspired genius—it’s the piano that takes center stage. Meanwhile, in the soaring Sonata No. 5 in F Major, Op. 24—one of the composer’s greatest chamber works, known as the “Spring” Sonata—Beethoven is at his passionate best, its opening movement almost symphonic in scope. Violinist Andrew Wan and pianist Charles Richard-Hamelin are perfect partners, wearing their virtuosity lightly to allow this extraordinary music to dance.

Violin Sonata No. 1 in D Major, Op. 12 No. 1
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Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12 No. 2
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Violin Sonata No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 12 No. 3
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Violin Sonata No. 5 in F Major, Op. 24, “Spring”
 
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