9 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1969, three Russian instrumentalist giants recorded together for the first time. Cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, violinist David Oistrakh, and pianist Sviatoslav Richter spent three mid-September days at the Jesus-Christ-Church Dahlem with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and their maestro, Herbert van Karajan, to record Beethoven’s Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Cello in C Major (a.k.a. the Triple Concerto). Karajan had recorded with Oistrakh and Rostropovich separately prior to this occasion. Rostropovich had been the soloist when Richter conducted his first symphony in 1952, and peers Oistrakh and Richter were influences on one another. So the interplay among the three early in the first ”Allegro” movement is a lesson in performance empathy, while the orchestra quietly glistens in the opening measures of the “Largo” movement. During the lively yet dignified “Rondo Alla Polacca” final movement, the brotherhood of all three men plus von Karajan encapsulates the spirit of the sessions.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1969, three Russian instrumentalist giants recorded together for the first time. Cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, violinist David Oistrakh, and pianist Sviatoslav Richter spent three mid-September days at the Jesus-Christ-Church Dahlem with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and their maestro, Herbert van Karajan, to record Beethoven’s Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Cello in C Major (a.k.a. the Triple Concerto). Karajan had recorded with Oistrakh and Rostropovich separately prior to this occasion. Rostropovich had been the soloist when Richter conducted his first symphony in 1952, and peers Oistrakh and Richter were influences on one another. So the interplay among the three early in the first ”Allegro” movement is a lesson in performance empathy, while the orchestra quietly glistens in the opening measures of the “Largo” movement. During the lively yet dignified “Rondo Alla Polacca” final movement, the brotherhood of all three men plus von Karajan encapsulates the spirit of the sessions.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

From Beethoven ,

Triple Concerto and Coral

The Triple Concerto is a unique piece within the concerts, it is for three instruments, piano, violin and viola and the soloists were the very best in that moment and now, besides this, it aline the energy of the chacras when we listen it.
The Coral is a real master piece, it has to be listen to understand what I said, I love both,
Martha

RPromm ,

Beethoven Triple Concerto

This piece is wonderful. The reason it does not get presented that much is that it requires 3 virtuosos. This happens to be the best 3 that they could find.

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