12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The early-'90s grunge explosion affected all rock acts. It hastened the end of most hair-metal bands and forced alternative groups to rethink their sound. No one benefited more from this change of scenery than INXS, who were looking for the next step after Kick and X. Producer Mark Opitz, who’d worked with the group on their third album, Shabooh Shoobah, helped the band immensely here, giving them a tougher sound that didn’t sacrifice the synths or the dance-rock elements. “Communication” is simply a blazing track that dries out the band’s sound in spots and puts Michael Hutchence’s vocals through some smart effects. Sitars and a 60-piece orchestra find their way into the mix of “Baby Don’t Cry,” forcing the band to fight for their space. “Taste It” provides a fitting groove and arrangement for Hutchence’s classic rock vocal moves. Critics noted the changes, and the album received some of the best reviews of the band’s career.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The early-'90s grunge explosion affected all rock acts. It hastened the end of most hair-metal bands and forced alternative groups to rethink their sound. No one benefited more from this change of scenery than INXS, who were looking for the next step after Kick and X. Producer Mark Opitz, who’d worked with the group on their third album, Shabooh Shoobah, helped the band immensely here, giving them a tougher sound that didn’t sacrifice the synths or the dance-rock elements. “Communication” is simply a blazing track that dries out the band’s sound in spots and puts Michael Hutchence’s vocals through some smart effects. Sitars and a 60-piece orchestra find their way into the mix of “Baby Don’t Cry,” forcing the band to fight for their space. “Taste It” provides a fitting groove and arrangement for Hutchence’s classic rock vocal moves. Critics noted the changes, and the album received some of the best reviews of the band’s career.

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