12 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Plant’s collaboration with Alison Krauss on 2007’s Raising Sand provided Percy with exactly the guidance he needed to re-find his love of folk music, which had been his passion prior to joining Led Zeppelin. Band of Joy had been the name of the group he led before Jimmy Page came around with an offer he smartly didn’t refuse. Playing music he always loved and that now better suits his range and energies, Plant is in strong form throughout 2010’s Band of Joy. The final song that Townes Van Zandt wrote, “Harm’s Swift Way,” is treated with empathy further enhanced by Patty Griffin’s sweet and sorrowful harmonies. Los Lobos’ “Angel Dance” is relocated from the L.A. barrio to the U.K.’s Black Country. “Silver Rider” and “Monkey” are both from Minnesota’s slo-core veterans Low and are transformed at Plant’s eager will. The traditional material is helped along by Buddy Miller’s coproduction, and his instrumentation, along with that of Darrell Scott, includes electric guitar, baritone guitar, mandoguitar, six-string bass, mandolin, banjo, accordion, pedal steel, and lap steel guitars.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Plant’s collaboration with Alison Krauss on 2007’s Raising Sand provided Percy with exactly the guidance he needed to re-find his love of folk music, which had been his passion prior to joining Led Zeppelin. Band of Joy had been the name of the group he led before Jimmy Page came around with an offer he smartly didn’t refuse. Playing music he always loved and that now better suits his range and energies, Plant is in strong form throughout 2010’s Band of Joy. The final song that Townes Van Zandt wrote, “Harm’s Swift Way,” is treated with empathy further enhanced by Patty Griffin’s sweet and sorrowful harmonies. Los Lobos’ “Angel Dance” is relocated from the L.A. barrio to the U.K.’s Black Country. “Silver Rider” and “Monkey” are both from Minnesota’s slo-core veterans Low and are transformed at Plant’s eager will. The traditional material is helped along by Buddy Miller’s coproduction, and his instrumentation, along with that of Darrell Scott, includes electric guitar, baritone guitar, mandoguitar, six-string bass, mandolin, banjo, accordion, pedal steel, and lap steel guitars.

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