12 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Using the relentless riff of “Balls to the Wall” as a battering ram, Accept broke through to the mainstream with its 1983 album of the same name. The title song was, is, and will always be a monster. It could be considered a more malicious and militant rejoinder to AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell.” Udo Dirkschneider often sounds like a more unhinged version of Bon Scott, especially on “Fight It Back” and “Turn Me On,” two of the album’s best songs. “Losers and Winners” is such a fiercely energized piece of metal that when Dirkschneider squeals “Write her a letter … you’ll feel better when it’s done,” the listener can't be sure that he’s talking about the postal service. Between the homoeroticism of the cover art and titles like “London Leatherboys,” Accept caught a lot of flak for promoting what some saw as “gay metal.” While the speculation was pointless (and false), Accept said it was interested in all marginalized sectors of society, including gay culture. Certainly, “Love Child,” written from the perspective of an alienated gay man, should be credited as one of the bravest songs in a genre often dismissed as socially regressive.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Using the relentless riff of “Balls to the Wall” as a battering ram, Accept broke through to the mainstream with its 1983 album of the same name. The title song was, is, and will always be a monster. It could be considered a more malicious and militant rejoinder to AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell.” Udo Dirkschneider often sounds like a more unhinged version of Bon Scott, especially on “Fight It Back” and “Turn Me On,” two of the album’s best songs. “Losers and Winners” is such a fiercely energized piece of metal that when Dirkschneider squeals “Write her a letter … you’ll feel better when it’s done,” the listener can't be sure that he’s talking about the postal service. Between the homoeroticism of the cover art and titles like “London Leatherboys,” Accept caught a lot of flak for promoting what some saw as “gay metal.” While the speculation was pointless (and false), Accept said it was interested in all marginalized sectors of society, including gay culture. Certainly, “Love Child,” written from the perspective of an alienated gay man, should be credited as one of the bravest songs in a genre often dismissed as socially regressive.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
76 Ratings

76 Ratings

peaches1122 ,

Any true metal head would have this in his arsenal.

Udo and company kick some tail on this album. It has always been one of my favorite albums. These guys keep and simple and to the point ... and loud.

deviantnature ,

Must have in any Metal arsenal!!!

Just the title track alone "Balls To The Wall" is worth the price of the whole album. Udo's vocals are absolutely King!!! Pure metal from Germany that gets a 10 out of 10 in my book. Buy it and turn it up!

80's Metalhead ,

Absolute Masterpiece!

As my nickname states, I am an 80's metalhead. This is one of those albums which if I had to pick only 10 CDs that I could listen to the rest of my life, this would be one of them. The guitar work on it, although not overly complicated, is outstanding and grabs you by the doodads from the opening riffs of Balls to the Wall and doesn't let go until it is over. Udo's vocals are a perfect fit with this band and this album. There are a lot of CDs I have that I only like one or two songs on, but this isn't one of them. It is excellent from start to finish. You will not be disappointed by this one, I promise!

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