14 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Howl, their 2005 detour into acoustic Dylanism, got a surprisingly warm response, one expected more of the same from San Francisco’s BRMC. Instead, they trumped those expectations by daring to return to the big noise of the ‘90s Britpop/Jesus & Mary Chain-rooted electric-guitar sound that made their original reputation here. Which isn’t to say they didn’t learn a few things about focused songcraft from their previous detour into rootsy Americana. As produced by the band and the Call’s Michael Been, early tracks like “Berlin” and the single “Weapon of Choice” never let the sonic murk get in the way of the hooks, a balancing act that doesn’t necessarily yield the same results on the album’s middle third. The album’s gravity point seems the expansive “American X,” which drones with ambitious Psychedelic Furs intensity, if not quite the same hypnotic intrigue. It’s an album that strikes a complicated bargain, daring to return to the aura that won the band its original following, while challenging the converts it won with Howl.  

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Howl, their 2005 detour into acoustic Dylanism, got a surprisingly warm response, one expected more of the same from San Francisco’s BRMC. Instead, they trumped those expectations by daring to return to the big noise of the ‘90s Britpop/Jesus & Mary Chain-rooted electric-guitar sound that made their original reputation here. Which isn’t to say they didn’t learn a few things about focused songcraft from their previous detour into rootsy Americana. As produced by the band and the Call’s Michael Been, early tracks like “Berlin” and the single “Weapon of Choice” never let the sonic murk get in the way of the hooks, a balancing act that doesn’t necessarily yield the same results on the album’s middle third. The album’s gravity point seems the expansive “American X,” which drones with ambitious Psychedelic Furs intensity, if not quite the same hypnotic intrigue. It’s an album that strikes a complicated bargain, daring to return to the aura that won the band its original following, while challenging the converts it won with Howl.  

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
193 Ratings

193 Ratings

P.21 ,

Good Stuff!

These guys just keep on getting better!! "Weapon of Choice" is a great song, so is "American X"...(all of them are good)

I must say, the variety of this CD is so wide that you can listen to it over and over and it never gets boring. Do not hesitate buying this CD, if you liked Howl and B.R.M.C, you are going to LOVE Baby 81!!!

Steve Singiser ,

Excellent Rock Album

On their debut album, this US/UK trio asked "Whatever Happened to My Rock n Roll?" This album seems to be a pretty definitive answer. This album shows a polished, confident band that have become true rock n roll utility players. From the hard-charging tracks like the opening single (the politically charged "Weapon of Choice") to the more pop-infused tracks like "Not What You Wanted", this album has precious few "skip-over" tracks. Choice tracks (for those with only $3 or $4 to spare): "Weapon of Choice", "Berlin", "Lien on Your Dreams", and "Cold Wind". Although, go ahead and throw down the full freight, it is worth it.

hoot1343 ,

Truly Howl's Sister

Unlike Most Artist Brmc does not try to go for the same aound that they usually do. ALthough many people compare this to their debut brmc this album is much different and more professional sounding.
The best ytracks that i reccomend are
Windows
Am i only
american x

and of course weapon of choice all these songs capture brmc at a new point in their musical carrer

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