17 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Stone Sour is Slipknot frontman Corey Taylor's first band, though they often get dismissed as a side project. Their third studio album finds the GRAMMY-nominated quintet pulling their alt-metal sound back into the both the '90s and the '70s as "Mission Statement" opens with guitar distortion steeped in the muddy sludge of Seattle grunge while the infectious "Say You'll Haunt Me" plays with the catchy, ascending melodies of an old Boston song. Unlike their 2002 eponymous debut and 2006's Come What(ever) May, 2010's Audio Secrecy bares no spoken-word track. But they've honed their songwriting skills, leaning less on big rock riffs and successfully experimenting with a layered approach to the architecture of tunes like "Hesitate," which begins with single notes accompanying Taylor's voice before arpeggios and a rhythm section are stacked on to build a ballad that all comes together by the chorus. The end result sounds a bit like Asia's "Heat of the Moment" (in a good way). "Nylon 6/6" brings back the rawk, as does "Hate Not Gone," easily the heaviest tune of the three bonus tracks.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Stone Sour is Slipknot frontman Corey Taylor's first band, though they often get dismissed as a side project. Their third studio album finds the GRAMMY-nominated quintet pulling their alt-metal sound back into the both the '90s and the '70s as "Mission Statement" opens with guitar distortion steeped in the muddy sludge of Seattle grunge while the infectious "Say You'll Haunt Me" plays with the catchy, ascending melodies of an old Boston song. Unlike their 2002 eponymous debut and 2006's Come What(ever) May, 2010's Audio Secrecy bares no spoken-word track. But they've honed their songwriting skills, leaning less on big rock riffs and successfully experimenting with a layered approach to the architecture of tunes like "Hesitate," which begins with single notes accompanying Taylor's voice before arpeggios and a rhythm section are stacked on to build a ballad that all comes together by the chorus. The end result sounds a bit like Asia's "Heat of the Moment" (in a good way). "Nylon 6/6" brings back the rawk, as does "Hate Not Gone," easily the heaviest tune of the three bonus tracks.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
634 Ratings

634 Ratings

148226121 ,

Awesome album

Stone sour rocks this album is awesome. After Avenged Sevenfold and Disturbed released their lasted albums now this this has been a great couple of weeks

Rock N' Rolla ,

WOAH!

just finished listening to all 18 tracks and let me say, i zoned out of the world and zoned into what life is really about.

every track opened a door way to another memory, possibility, and sumwat of dreams(:

great album and cant wait for you guys to come to LA and put on a fantastuc show!!!

much props guys(:

EverythingAndNothing ,

Stone Sour Evolved Into A New Band

Alright, here is a real review. I have actually listened to the album a couple of times and won't mindlessly post "first" as a review. Stone Sour was always a more mellow outlet for both Jim Root and Corey Taylor when compared to their other band Slipknot. This is understandable as not every song has to be screaming with thundering guitars. In fact, I would much prefer to have Corey use Stone Sour as his softer outlet instead of that spilling over into a Slipknot album (as it did in Vol. 3 and some parts of All Hope Is Gone). There are some songs on here that resemble the Stone Sour of old. Nylon 6/6 (though it is a little soft), Mission Statement, and Say You'll Haunt Me are a few examples. However, Stone Sour has taken their pogression from their past album and applied it to more songs.

In other words, they have become softer than in their earlier days. Many songs sound as if they spliced together something from their last album along with the song "Bother" in order to form radio friendly softer rock tracks. This is my big issue with this album. It is fine if Stone Sour wants to sound soft. I would even welcome an entirely acoustic release from them. However, they were never about making mindless radio rock songs. I despise radio rock songs as they are mindless and made for one thing only: being played on the radio so people will go out and download them.

Overall, the album has some shining moments but the radio rock songs (Miracles, Dying, Pieces, etc.) knock it down by a few stars. I don't think this is Stone Sour's strongest release and easily rank their first two major releases above this. I just hope that Corey and Jim turn around and make a true Slipknot album next time. I hope that they were able to get all of their soft ambitions out of the way with this release. It is a shame that they decided to take this path with this album. Many bands have abandoned their roots in favor of radio rock songs. I am sorry but we just don't need another top 40 band such as Seether, Drowning Pool, or Nickelback. Stone Sour hasn't lost a fan just yet. I will still support them but I think they need to work a little harder for the next album and stop trying to come out with material that will be played on the radio. Instead, they need to make an album true to themselves and not worry about cashing out.

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