11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though not quite as raw as the bedroom (woodshed?) recording How To Survive In The Woods (released later the same year), Brooklyn’s Woods delivered its Shrimper Records debut wrapped in the wooly, murky layers that would become a trademark. Jeremy Earl and Christian DeRoeck (Earl’s bandmates change with each release) use ‘60s folk-rock touchstones as inspiration for their rough and organic sound, one richly conflated with an urbane, artistic sensibility. “Love Song for Pigeons” sounds like a late-night loft party, but the wood blocks and sour strumming are rooted in Appalachia; “Walk the Dogs” has a bit of the hillbilly nightmare in it, but evokes the sophistication of Tom Waits. Torn between folk and rock, Woods’ dual identity is exemplified by tracks like the ramshackle “Be Still,” hinting at their Dinosaur, Jr. affinity that later colors much of their work, and on the lysergically evocative “Picking Up the Pieces.” The first three tracks are wonderfully woozy and memorable takes on the duo’s interpretation of “pop” music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though not quite as raw as the bedroom (woodshed?) recording How To Survive In The Woods (released later the same year), Brooklyn’s Woods delivered its Shrimper Records debut wrapped in the wooly, murky layers that would become a trademark. Jeremy Earl and Christian DeRoeck (Earl’s bandmates change with each release) use ‘60s folk-rock touchstones as inspiration for their rough and organic sound, one richly conflated with an urbane, artistic sensibility. “Love Song for Pigeons” sounds like a late-night loft party, but the wood blocks and sour strumming are rooted in Appalachia; “Walk the Dogs” has a bit of the hillbilly nightmare in it, but evokes the sophistication of Tom Waits. Torn between folk and rock, Woods’ dual identity is exemplified by tracks like the ramshackle “Be Still,” hinting at their Dinosaur, Jr. affinity that later colors much of their work, and on the lysergically evocative “Picking Up the Pieces.” The first three tracks are wonderfully woozy and memorable takes on the duo’s interpretation of “pop” music.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

Elliott the Barn Owl ,

The Defenition of Underappreciated

WOODS is a compilement of some great acoustic folk/indie and coupled with the slightest bits of abstract experimentation. We're not talking "Of Montreal-esque-how many vauge references to independent films, books, and artists can we make in one sitting while offbeat, obscure synth plays in background." They present more of a "pots-n-pans" experimentation. A must listen for anyone who is a fan of Iron & Wine, Neutral Milk Hotel, The Shins, or just likes being a pretenious hipster.

MetalFaceDrew ,

Just Fantastic

Seriously gorgeous little music. Don't let the falsettos fool you, these songs can get as deep as the best of them. It's Lo-Fi, slightly messy production is exactly what I want to hear in these dark days of squeaky clean recording work. It's just a great album, warts and all. I'm sure they would disagree with me but it sort of reminds me of Doug Martsch's solo work. I am exceedingly happy having purchased this album. And you will be as well.

terminalcurl ,

Definitely my favorite Woods album

The songs are written a lot better, the melodies are a lot catchier, more at ease and less emphasis on the lo-fi portion of the band. A lot of the songs on Songs of Shame sound the same and Jeremy Earl's falsetto gets a bit tiring. With this, there's variety and moodiness. But if I were to go through Woods INCLUDING related material, Woods Family Creeps' S/T album on Time-Lag. RIP Meneguar.

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