Editors’ Notes While Jethro Tull’s 1971 album is peppered with acoustic turns—bowing to jazz-folk heroes like Roy Harper—it’s the sweltering power chords and frontman Ian Anderson’s tough vocals that make it a rock ’n’ roll Goliath. The chugging “Locomotive Breath” and the dirty thump of “Hymn 43” provide metallic KOs, and the rifftastic title tune is a full-on mini-rock opera with gentle breakdowns and tempo shifts. Central themes challenge organized religions, yet there’s a Dickensian quality to many of the lyrics, especially on the grimy “Cross-Eyed Mary,” which details London street urchins.

SONG
Aqualung
1
6:36
 
Cross-Eyed Mary
2
4:10
 
Cheap Day Return
3
1:20
 
Mother Goose
4
3:52
 
Wond'ring Aloud
5
1:53
 
Up to Me
6
3:14
 
My God
7
7:11
 
Hymn 43
8
3:16
 
Slipstream
9
1:11
 
Locomotive Breath
10
4:26
 
Wind-Up
11
6:00
 
Lick Your Fingers Clean
12
2:46
 
Wind-Up (Quad Version)
13
5:23
 
Ian Anderson Interview
14
13:58
 

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