12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Woods continue their consistent run of memorable releases with Sun and Shade. Loosely intertwined, country-fried acoustic and electric guitars, expressive percussion, and Jeremy Earl’s distinctive high-pitched quiver are mixed with gentle tape loops and sunny psychedelic textures to create a sound that encompasses both indie slacker and Deadhead sensibilities. The concise “Any Other Day,” “Be All Be Easy,” and “Say Goodbye” achieve a jangly, sun-burnt glow, and “Pushing Onlys,” “Hand It Out,” and “Who Do I Think I Am?” are the kind of superbly-crafted melodic pop tunes that Woods are able to pull out of the haze with disarming ease. “Out of the Eye” and the vaguely Middle Eastern-leaning “Sol y Sombra” sound like something the Byrds and the Velvet Underground would create if they shared a rehearsal space. Interjecting these meandering, mesmerizing jams into the set is an interesting risk that pays off by showcasing both sides of the band. Woods cover a lot of sonic territory on Sun and Shade, and the way in which they make the familiar sound mysterious is simply thrilling.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Woods continue their consistent run of memorable releases with Sun and Shade. Loosely intertwined, country-fried acoustic and electric guitars, expressive percussion, and Jeremy Earl’s distinctive high-pitched quiver are mixed with gentle tape loops and sunny psychedelic textures to create a sound that encompasses both indie slacker and Deadhead sensibilities. The concise “Any Other Day,” “Be All Be Easy,” and “Say Goodbye” achieve a jangly, sun-burnt glow, and “Pushing Onlys,” “Hand It Out,” and “Who Do I Think I Am?” are the kind of superbly-crafted melodic pop tunes that Woods are able to pull out of the haze with disarming ease. “Out of the Eye” and the vaguely Middle Eastern-leaning “Sol y Sombra” sound like something the Byrds and the Velvet Underground would create if they shared a rehearsal space. Interjecting these meandering, mesmerizing jams into the set is an interesting risk that pays off by showcasing both sides of the band. Woods cover a lot of sonic territory on Sun and Shade, and the way in which they make the familiar sound mysterious is simply thrilling.

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