12 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the first Hot Tuna studio album since 1990’s Pair a Dice Found, which itself was the first studio album since the ‘70s, Steady As She Goes is a truly long-awaited event. Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady are joined by drummer Skoota Warner, mandolin player Barry Mitterhoff, vocalist Teresa Williams and producer/ multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell. This solid, no-nonsense lineup went into Levon Helm’s studio in Woodstock, NY — and much like Kaukonen’s spirited solo album, River of Time, which features many from this line-up — they turned in performances that are warm to the touch. “Angel of Darkness” is pitch-perfect in its economy and electric sizzle. “Second Chances” is a touching ballad. “Mama Let Me Lay It On You,” the original version of what Eric Von Schmidt and Bob Dylan found as “Baby, Let Me Follow You Down,” plays as a perfect example of what a band is supposed to do. “If This Is Love” is more perfect ensemble playing. “Things That Might Have Been” shows Jorma in singer-songwriter mode, playing a tune personal and deep. You can’t ask for better.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the first Hot Tuna studio album since 1990’s Pair a Dice Found, which itself was the first studio album since the ‘70s, Steady As She Goes is a truly long-awaited event. Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady are joined by drummer Skoota Warner, mandolin player Barry Mitterhoff, vocalist Teresa Williams and producer/ multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell. This solid, no-nonsense lineup went into Levon Helm’s studio in Woodstock, NY — and much like Kaukonen’s spirited solo album, River of Time, which features many from this line-up — they turned in performances that are warm to the touch. “Angel of Darkness” is pitch-perfect in its economy and electric sizzle. “Second Chances” is a touching ballad. “Mama Let Me Lay It On You,” the original version of what Eric Von Schmidt and Bob Dylan found as “Baby, Let Me Follow You Down,” plays as a perfect example of what a band is supposed to do. “If This Is Love” is more perfect ensemble playing. “Things That Might Have Been” shows Jorma in singer-songwriter mode, playing a tune personal and deep. You can’t ask for better.

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